North Korean satellite launch fails

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  • #1
Pengwuino
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http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/04/12/11168783-north-korea-rocket-breaks-up-after-much-touted-launch?lite [Broken]

PYONGYANG, North Korea -- North Korea's long-range rocket failed early Friday, U.S. officials said, calling it a blow for the reclusive state's propoganda efforts.

The rocket broke up about 90 seconds after taking off, an official told NBC News...

NORAD, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, said the rocket's first stage fell into the sea and two other stages failed.

Okay, we can go back to laughing at North Korea again.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Evo
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It is rather a downer for N Korea.
 
  • #3
mege
It is rather a downer for N Korea.

Not that their citizens are aware of it. They'll just say "what launch?"
 
  • #4
Evo
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Not that their citizens are aware of it. They'll just say "what launch?"
True.
 
  • #5
Pengwuino
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I have recently come under the impression that the public believes NK has already put satellites into orbit years ago.
 
  • #6
CAC1001
I am glad, as we don't want the NKs having the ability to launch a long-range missile.
 
  • #7
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I have recently come under the impression that the public believes NK has already put satellites into orbit years ago.

This is true, I toured a museum there and they had a large room filled with photos of "successful" "satellite" launches.
 
  • #8
russ_watters
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Was that museum built for North Koreans or was it built for you?
 
  • #9
russ_watters
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http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/04/12/11168783-north-korea-rocket-breaks-up-after-much-touted-launch?lite [Broken]

Okay, we can go back to laughing at North Korea again.
CNN said:
U.S.–North Korea relations recently enjoyed 16 optimistic days: between February 29, when Pyongyang signed the “Leap Day” arms control agreement with the United States, and March 16, when it announced plans to conduct the very kind of rocket launch that it had just forsworn.
http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2012/04/12/why-north-korea-gets-away-with-it/?hpt=hp_t1

Who's laughing at who?

And here's what happens next: Over the next few weeks we will affirm for Baby Kim that like his father, he's the Most Powerful Man in the World (reclaiming the throne NK temporarily lost to Bashar Assad), dooming the North Korean people to two more generations of famine and poverty and South Koreans to two more generations of living in his shadow. Hilarious stuff.
 
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  • #10
BobG
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http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/04/12/11168783-north-korea-rocket-breaks-up-after-much-touted-launch?lite [Broken]



Okay, we can go back to laughing at North Korea again.

For a while. Most countries that try to launch a satellite (or develop an ICBM) eventually do succeed, with failures of actual launches indicating they're close enough that they're actually building some and rolling out some prototypes.

The fact that the first few attempts fail is like the fact that, the first time you try running the computer program you wrote, it will probably fail. It was at least close enough to being "final" that you had to run the entire program to see what happened.

The fact that they're attempting launches in the first place usually means they're getting close to a final product.

While "rocket science" is difficult, as in takes several years, I think it would be hard to find a country that reached the launch attempt stage without eventually succeeding.
 
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  • #11
turbo
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Depending on the mass of the payload and the type of orbit NK wants to achieve, it might be tough to launch from their latitude, even if they have sufficient thrust and modest mass.
 
  • #12
chemisttree
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Depending on the mass of the payload and the type of orbit NK wants to achieve, it might be tough to launch from their latitude, even if they have sufficient thrust and modest mass.

Pssst! That wasn't really what they were trying to do!
 
  • #15
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The amount of $$ required for the launch attempt is about the same amount of $$ to feed the entire NK population for a year.

According to The Daily Focus (A South Korean internet based newspaper) - have no idea on its credibility though....
 
  • #16
Fredrik
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Two dollar signs is how you begin and end a segment of LaTeX code. The stuff you wrote in the middle is interpreted as variables, not text.
 
  • #17
Ryan_m_b
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This is true, I toured a museum there and they had a large room filled with photos of "successful" "satellite" launches.
:surprised such a strange country
Who's laughing at who?

And here's what happens next: Over the next few weeks we will affirm for Baby Kim that like his father, he's the Most Powerful Man in the World (reclaiming the throne NK temporarily lost to Bashar Assad), dooming the North Korean people to two more generations of famine and poverty and South Koreans to two more generations of living in his shadow. Hilarious stuff.
Agreed. As strange as NK may be its common people are in a bad situation, it's even worse because of extensive propaganda and media control that means they probably don't even realise.
 
  • #18
jhae2.718
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