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NASA global warming satellite crashes after launch

  1. Feb 24, 2009 #1

    Evo

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    Ouch, $289 million. I wonder why it malfunctioned?

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090224/ap_on_sc/sci_carbon_satellite [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 24, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Thats pretty cheap for an Earth observation mission.

    It obviously hit the crystal sphere that surrounds the Earth and keeps out the waters of the heavens and to which the fixed stars are attached. Thus disproving the 'theory' of orbits and gravity that so many so-called-scientists are proposing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2009
  4. Feb 24, 2009 #3

    Q_Goest

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    lol @ mgb_phys

    Apparantly the nose cone didn't separate. Here's a picture of it:
    http://www.spaceflightnow.com/taurus/oco/preflight/08.jpg

    Here's some background:
    And an explanation of what happened:
    Ref: http://spaceflightnow.com/taurus/oco/status.html
     
  5. Feb 24, 2009 #4

    Evo

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    Thanks Q_Goest, but MGB's explanation is much easier to swallow.
     
  6. Feb 24, 2009 #5
    Anti-AGW conspiracy anyone?:yuck:

    One good thing about this: Kepler launches in about 10 days, what are the chances of back-to-back failures? Hopefully not good, if one of the two had to fail, I'm glad it was OCO.:devil:
     
  7. Feb 24, 2009 #6

    mgb_phys

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    If you believe that - I can sell you a coin that came up heads last time, so next time it will come up tails and you can bet heavily on it!

    Fortunately Kepler is being launched on a rocket that actually works (Delta II)
     
  8. Feb 24, 2009 #7
    How much?!

    But yes I know, I have a vague understanding of probabilities...but anything to put my mind at ease because I really don't want this one to blow up! :cry:But maybe this accident will prompt scientists and engineers to check over every detail one extra time. Sorta like rigging that coin to have its chances of coming up tails slightly improved. I'd buy that coin.:biggrin:
     
  9. Feb 24, 2009 #8

    mgb_phys

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    The DeltaII is amazingly reliable - only one 'kerboom' in 140 launches.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2009
  10. Feb 24, 2009 #9
    And thats whats known as "amazingly reliable" in the aerospace industry?
     
  11. Feb 24, 2009 #10

    Q_Goest

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    Actually, it is... but this wasn't a Delta.
     
  12. Feb 24, 2009 #11

    mgb_phys

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    It is in the launch business, that's why anything that matters (eg. GPS) goes up on a Delta rather than the shuttle.

    That was referring to the upcoming Kepler launch.

    Back to somebodies point about launching a repalcement cheaply.
    It's always tricky to say how much of the $280M sticker price a copy would cost.
    The R+D and design have been done and a lot of the components will have flight spares.
    But much of the money would be earmarked for support costs and salaries of the researchers. They would have to be paid for the time it would take to build a replacement or they would move to a new areas and other researchers would have to start again.

    In the case of Hubble, with the delays after the challenger accident and the huge scale of the STSCI the price of the craft was probably only 10% of the project cost.
     
  13. Feb 24, 2009 #12

    Evo

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    I think this affects one of my more recent ex-boyfriends. He's Director and Senior Research Scientist at Colorado State University, in Ft Colins, CO. He has a PhD in Atmoshpheric Science. He gets to report in person to Congress on "global warming".

    Oh well, it gives me an excuse to e-mail him. Super nice guy. I must have been crazy to let him go.

    <sigh>
     
  14. Feb 24, 2009 #13

    mgb_phys

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    That's why i never worked on space stuff.
    Some friends of mine were working on WIRE (an infrared space telescope) after a couple of aborted launches it went up perfectly, pointed itself at the sun and boiled off all it's liquid helium. Game over.
     
  15. Feb 24, 2009 #14

    Evo

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    :rofl:
     
  16. Feb 24, 2009 #15

    mgb_phys

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    Just checked the details it's even worse.
    It was deliberately pointed at the Earth to establish comms, but the lens cap had ejected too soon and the brightness of the Earth seen through the telescope was enough to boil off all the cryogen.
     
  17. Feb 24, 2009 #16

    Evo

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    Oh dear.
     
  18. Feb 24, 2009 #17

    Astronuc

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    The rocket actually worked, but the last piece, the fairing on the payload section failed.

    The rocket is a Taurus, which is manufactured by Orbital Sciences Corp.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurus_(rocket [Broken])

    They've had 2 failures in eight launches. :uhh:

    With the reduced mass after the fairing falls away, the satellite should have made orbit - in a near polar orbit. With the mass of the fairing, it didn't make the necessary ΔV.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  19. Feb 24, 2009 #18

    BobG

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    Not only is it reliable, it can melt tire rims.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=appMDzLeT_Q


    A view from further away.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdBwjtgHDi8
     
  20. Feb 24, 2009 #19

    Astronuc

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    And they sparkle!
     
  21. Feb 24, 2009 #20

    fluidistic

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    That may sound funny but I'm a bit saddened to learn about the failure of the mission. It seemed an interesting study that just won't happen for now. I hope they'll launch another satellite with the same goals and that it will be safer.
     
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