1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Nuclear Mechanical Engineering

Tags:
  1. Jan 2, 2017 #1
    Hello Dears
    I am Mechanical Engineering Technology and I am thinking to get Master degree in Nuclear Engineering/ Nuclear Mechanical Engineering. So, is it possible to do that and in which university?

    Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2017 #2
    I think you may find that the "technology" aspect of you MET degree will limit your options as far as a straight engineering graduate program. I would hesitate to say it is impossible, but I would not be surprised if a substantial amount of undergraduate course work was required in the process.
     
  4. Jan 2, 2017 #3

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Several issues, a few alluded to by Dr.D:

    1. What exactly is "Nuclear Mechanical Engineering"? Can you cite schools that offer such a degree?

    2. "Mechanical Engineering Technology" degree is different than "Mechanical Engineering" degree. You will have quite a number of courses to make up to reach the equivalent of a Mechanical Engineering degree, and thus, I do not know to what extent such a degree are considered to be sufficient for one to use to seek entry to a Masters degree in NE or ME.

    3. What is your goal here? Why are you going for a Masters degree rather than, say, a PhD? What do you intend to do?

    4. And finally, the IMPORTANT piece of information that many new members often omit, where in the world are you, or where in the world do you intend to go to school?

    Zz.
     
  5. Jan 2, 2017 #4
    Zapper Z raises the question, "Why are you going for a Masters degree rather than, say a PhD? What do you intend to do?" This is certainly a question of major importance, and the OP must have a clear objective in mind here. However, there is no reason at all why a MS is not an appropriate step towards a PhD.

    For engineering employment (nonacademic), I think in many cases a MS is preferable to a PhD. I cannot tell you how many times I've been told "You are over qualified." I have wanted to say, "But I do have a MS" but that is never heard. For many engineering employers, a PhD is frightening.
     
  6. Jan 2, 2017 #5

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Just to be clear, I'm not advocating the OP to pursue a PhD. However, I've seen way too many members, especially those who are from outside the US, who had a goal of obtaining a PhD, but thought that they need to pursue a Masters degree first. It is why I inquire what the OP's objective really is in seeking a Masters degree in such a field.

    Zz.
     
  7. Jan 3, 2017 #6
    so, there is no school or way to get in this field?
     
  8. Jan 3, 2017 #7

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Did you even read and attempt to answer and address the questions being asked?

    Zz.
     
  9. Jan 3, 2017 #8

    Choppy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    There are a lot of schools that offer master's degrees in mechanical engineering. There are a lot of schools that offer master's degrees in nuclear engineering. I'm not sure that there are that many that offer a master's degree that combines the two disciplines, although I am sure there are areas where the two fields overlap.

    In most places, to qualify for admission to master's program, you need to complete a bachelor's degree. In North America, when you attach the word "technology" to a degree, it's not equivalent to a four year bachelor's degree and therefore doesn't qualify you for admission to a master's program. You would have to build on your existing education by enrolling in a bachelor's program first and then compete for admissions to a graduate program. My understanding is that this is not the case in other parts of the world, which is why it helps to identify where you are or where you would like to attend.
     
  10. Jan 3, 2017 #9
    In many respects, nuclear engineering is a subfield of mechanical engineering. Nuclear engineering consists mostly of heat transfer and fluid flow engineering, pressure vessels,r continuous flow processes, all of which are taught in both Mechanical and Chemical Engineering.

    If the OP has something else in mind when saying "nuclear mechanical engineering," it would be helpful to identify just what he has in mind.
     
  11. Jan 3, 2017 #10
    thank you
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted