Oldest material found on Earth?

  • #1
pinball1970
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Summary:

Oldest material found on earth?


This popped up in live science


https://www.livescience.com/oldest-material-on-earth.html


This on PNAS


https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/01/07/1904573117


Murchison meteorite fell 1969 in Australia.

As well as interesting organics such as bases and amino acids previously found, scientists now claim to have found pre solar grains, billions of years older than the solar system.

Answers and Replies

  • #2
jim mcnamara
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  • #3
pinball1970
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@davenn may know more
Thanks Jim
Ive just posted to him, he collects meteors from memory!
 
  • #4
jim mcnamara
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The @ [username] construct sends a "Ding" - the bell shape on the upper right hand side turns red (title bar)

Testing: @pinball1970 will cause you to get a ding.

Be sure to click in the pop-up window when you start an @ construct to auto-magically create the right syntax - hidden otherwise behind ordinary looking type. It turns blue when you post. If you go back and edit you (bbcode set on gear looking thing) see [ USER=551850]@pinball1970[/USER ] - no spaces. spaces turn it off.
 
  • #5
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Summary:: Oldest material found on earth?


This popped up in live science


https://www.livescience.com/oldest-material-on-earth.html


This on PNAS


https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/01/07/1904573117


Murchison meteorite fell 1969 in Australia.

As well as interesting organics such as bases and amino acids previously found, scientists now claim to have found pre solar grains, billions of years older than the solar system.

Oldest material found on earth?
This popped up in live science
https://www.livescience.com/oldest-material-on-earth.html
This on PNAS
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/01/07/1904573117
Any discussions here? Nothing on Murchison.
I'm not quite sure what you are asking. We have known of the existence of inclusions within meteorites that avoided melting (and "clock resetting") for two or three decades. All of these are, necessarily, older than the 4.57 billion year age of the solar system. This Murchison example is the oldest yet discovered.

The chemistry of the grains and especially the isotope composition should give clues into the source of material for the GMC from which the solar system formed.

I find it intriguing that a meteorite that fell to Earth half a century ago is still capable of providing new insights into planetary formation and interstellar chemistry.
 
  • #6
pinball1970
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I'm not quite sure what you are asking. We have known of the existence of inclusions within meteorites that avoided melting (and "clock resetting") for two or three decades. All of these are, necessarily, older than the 4.57 billion year age of the solar system. This Murchison example is the oldest yet discovered.

The chemistry of the grains and especially the isotope composition should give clues into the source of material for the GMC from which the solar system formed.

I find it intriguing that a meteorite that fell to Earth half a century ago is still capable of providing new insights into planetary formation and interstellar chemistry.
I was amazed when I read material that predated the sun by several billion years had been identified.
I have read about the Murchison from an organics pov but was not aware of material that ancient.
 
  • #7
davenn
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Oldest material found on earth?
This popped up in live science
https://www.livescience.com/oldest-material-on-earth.html
This on PNAS
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/01/07/1904573117
Any discussions here? Nothing on Murchison.
Thanks for that, I'm aware of this meteorite, pretty sure I don't have a sample of that one yet.
But I was unaware of the deeper details of this meteorite ...
very informative, specially that second article.

You may now start to see my fascination with meteorites, holding something that has zoomed through space for billions of years
and finally to land on Earth and to be able to hold it. It's very cool :smile:


Dave
 
  • #8
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You may now start to see my fascination with meteorites, holding something that has zoomed through space for billions of years
and finally to land on Earth and to be able to hold it. It's very cool :smile:
Not the outer surface when it first landed. :wink:

Meanwhile, back on track: I've been trying to find a good general review paper on solar grains, thus far without success. This one, Presolar silicate grains: Abundances, isotopic and elemental compositions, and the effects of secondary processing, is the best I can come up with so far. It is thorough in addressing the topics of the title, but has, appropriately, almost nothing to say about the insights into nucleosynthesis that presolar grains present. That is an aspect I had not properly appreciated till sent trawling in Google Scholar by the OP. This paper, Production of Mo and Ru Isotopes in Neutrino-driven Winds: Implications for Solar Abundances and Presolar Grains, is the sort of example I had in mind.
 
  • #9
chemisttree
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You may now start to see my fascination with meteorites, holding something that has zoomed through space for billions of years
and finally to land on Earth and to be able to hold it. It's very cool :smile:

Dave
Sure is. Of course that’s true of terrestrial rocks as well!
 

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