Operating Machine A with Machine B: A Technical Guide

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In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of operating machine A, which requires 3000rpm and 10Nm torque, with machine B, which has a maximum torque of 7Nm and rotates at 1500rpm. The speaker asks if it is possible to use gears to achieve this, how to calculate the gear size, and if the load on machine B will increase. The expert summarizer explains that it is not possible to operate machine A with the given design values and suggests using a more powerful motor or reducing the revolution frequency or torque. They also mention that gears can increase rpm and reduce torque, but with some losses.
  • #1
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Dear Engineers,

Asslam u Alaikum(May peace be upon all of you)

I have machine A, rotates at 3000 rpm and required torque to rotate is 10 NM.
I want to operator this machine with an other machine B(motor) of 1500 rpm which can gives the torque of 7 NM max.
bc i m Electrical person and don't know much about this so I hv following questions

1. Can I operate it by using 2 gears,1 to shaft of machine A and 2nd to the shaft of machine B?
2. How can i calculate the gears size to meet the torque and rpm?
3. will the load of machine B increase in this case, even using gears? bc I don't want big difference in current.

regards

zafar
 
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  • #2
If machine A requires 3000rpm with a torque of 10Nm, it needs a power of 3000rpm*10Nm*2pi = 3.1kW.
Your motor can deliver a maximum of 1500rpm*7Nm*2pi = 1.1kW. Gears cannot produce energy out of nowhere - there is no way to operate machine A with your design values with motor B. You have to reduce revolution frequency or torque, or use a more powerful motor.
 
  • #3
For an idealized motor, max torque occurs at zero rpm (stalled) and max rpm occurs with zero torque (no load). Maximum power occurs at 1/2 max rpm with 1/2 the max torque. As mentioned above, you need a more powerful motor.
 
  • #4
mfb said:
If machine A requires 3000rpm with a torque of 10Nm, it needs a power of 3000rpm*10Nm*2pi = 3.1kW.
Your motor can deliver a maximum of 1500rpm*7Nm*2pi = 1.1kW. Gears cannot produce energy out of nowhere - there is no way to operate machine A with your design values with motor B. You have to reduce revolution frequency or torque, or use a more powerful motor.

...
thanks for your reply

So is there any way to increase rpm of machine A using gears on machine B, i. e. by increasing the torque of machine B and using a rather larger gears set, I mean what will happen if i use a motor A of 750 rpm which gives the torque of 14 NM.
 
  • #5
Motor A, machine A? I am confused.

Gears can increase rpm and reduce torque, or reduce rpm and increase torque - always with some losses of course.
If your motor cannot deliver the given maximal torque value at the given rpm value, you also have to take into account the effect rcgldr mentioned.
 

1. How do I know if Machine A and Machine B are compatible?

The best way to determine compatibility between Machine A and Machine B is to consult the user manuals for both machines. Look for any specific requirements or limitations outlined in the manuals, such as power supply, compatible software, or physical dimensions. You can also contact the manufacturers for further clarification.

2. What are the safety precautions I should take when operating Machine A with Machine B?

Always follow the safety guidelines outlined in the user manuals for both machines. This may include wearing protective gear, working in a well-ventilated area, and properly grounding the machines. It is also important to ensure that both machines are turned off and unplugged before connecting or disconnecting any components.

3. Can Machine A and Machine B be operated simultaneously?

This depends on the specific functions and capabilities of both machines. Some machines may have the ability to be synced and operated simultaneously, while others may not. Consult the user manuals for both machines to determine if this is possible.

4. Are there any maintenance or cleaning tasks I should perform when operating Machine A with Machine B?

Regular maintenance and cleaning are important for the proper functioning and longevity of both machines. Consult the user manuals for specific instructions on how to clean and maintain each machine, as well as any recommended schedules for these tasks.

5. Can I use Machine B with Machine A if I am not familiar with operating either machine?

It is always best to have some knowledge and understanding of each machine before attempting to operate them together. If you are not familiar with either machine, it is recommended to seek assistance from a trained professional or to thoroughly read and understand the user manuals before attempting to operate them together.

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