Operating temperature of Fuel Cells

In summary, the operating temperature of a fuel cell refers to the temperature at which the cell needs to be brought to in order to function. This can vary depending on the type of fuel cell, with solid oxide systems requiring a temperature range of 600 to 1000 C and phosphoric acid systems requiring a temperature range of 150 to 200 C. It is important to note that all fuel cells will produce heat equivalent to the amount of electricity they generate, making them about 50% efficient.
  • #1
elm-chris
2
0
What does the operating temperature of a fuel cell mean? Is this the temperature the cell generates or the temperature the cell is brought to so that it can operate? I see articles that state operating temperatures for different fuel cell systems---i.e. solid oxide 600 to 1000 C, phosphoric acid 150 to 200 C etc, but do not know what that means
 
Computer science news on Phys.org
  • #2
elm-chris said:
What does the operating temperature of a fuel cell mean? Is this the temperature the cell generates or the temperature the cell is brought to so that it can operate? I see articles that state operating temperatures for different fuel cell systems---i.e. solid oxide 600 to 1000 C, phosphoric acid 150 to 200 C etc, but do not know what that means
The latter, the temperature required for the fuel cell to operate. All fuel cells will produce about as much heat in watts as the produce in electricity, i.e., 50% efficient.
 
  • #3


The operating temperature of a fuel cell refers to the temperature range at which the fuel cell can efficiently produce electricity. This temperature is not necessarily the temperature that the cell generates, but rather the temperature at which it is brought to in order to operate effectively.

Different types of fuel cells have different optimal operating temperatures, as you mentioned with the solid oxide and phosphoric acid fuel cells. This is because the chemical reactions that occur within the fuel cell to produce electricity are affected by temperature. If the temperature is too low, the reactions may not occur at a fast enough rate to produce sufficient electricity. On the other hand, if the temperature is too high, the fuel cell components may degrade or become damaged.

Therefore, the operating temperature is a critical factor in the performance and longevity of a fuel cell. It is important for engineers and researchers to carefully design and control the operating temperature of a fuel cell in order to maximize its efficiency and lifespan.
 

Related to Operating temperature of Fuel Cells

1. What is the operating temperature range of fuel cells?

The operating temperature range of fuel cells varies depending on the type of fuel cell. However, most fuel cells operate within a range of 50-200 degrees Celsius.

2. Why is the operating temperature important for fuel cells?

The operating temperature is important for fuel cells because it affects their efficiency and performance. If the temperature is too low, the reaction rate may be too slow and the fuel cell may not produce enough power. If the temperature is too high, it can damage the fuel cell components.

3. How is the operating temperature controlled in fuel cells?

The operating temperature of fuel cells is controlled through various methods such as using a heat exchanger to maintain a constant temperature, adjusting the fuel flow rate, and using insulation to keep the heat generated by the fuel cell contained.

4. Can fuel cells operate at extreme temperatures?

Yes, certain types of fuel cells, such as solid oxide fuel cells, can operate at extreme temperatures above 800 degrees Celsius. These high temperatures allow for more efficient conversion of fuel into electricity.

5. What are the challenges of operating fuel cells at high temperatures?

Operating fuel cells at high temperatures can be challenging due to the need for specialized materials that can withstand the extreme temperatures, as well as the risk of thermal degradation of the fuel cell components. It also requires careful temperature control to prevent overheating or underperformance.

Similar threads

  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
759
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
712
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
14
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
963
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
3
Views
5K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
590
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
8K
Back
Top