Optimizing Hydrogen Combustion Catalysts for Efficient Stove Design

In summary, the conversation discusses using a catalytic stove for cooking with hydrogen, specifically using nickel as a catalyst instead of platinum. The person is wondering if a stainless scotch brite scrub pad or stainless steel wool can be used as a catalyst, and where to find information about combustion temperatures of hydrogen with different catalysts, including platinum. A study is mentioned where the T50% was found to be 250 °C with a Cu doped SnO2 catalyst at a GHSV of 42310 h–1. The conversation also mentions the importance of burner configuration and flow speed when using hydrogen as a fuel.
  • #1
seandepagnier
3
1
I am interested in build a hydrogen stove for cooking and wish to use a catalytic stove. I cannot find much information about this anywhere, but only that nickel can be used for hydrogen rather than platinum.

1) Can I just use stainless scotch brite scrub pad as catalyst assuming it contains nickel? Or stainless steel wool?
2) Where can I find information about the combustion temperatures of hydrogen with various catalysts including platinum?
 
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  • #2
Here is one article with much lower temperatures than a stove:
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.6b08019
(found with: https://www.google.com/search?&q=hydrogen+flame+catalyst)

The catalytic hydrogen combustion on Cu doped SnO2 catalysts was studied and the T50% was found to be 250 °C at a GHSV of 42310 h–1.(34) Hydrogen combustion with both reducible (TiO2) and nonreducible (ZrO2) supports has been studied with Pt and Pd substituted supports at a GHSV of 20000 h–1 and 2:1 ratio of H2:O2. T50% were obtained at 70 and 95 °C with Pd- and Pt-substituted ZrO2 catalysts, whereas Pt and Pd substituted reducible support TiO2 showed much higher activity by reducing temperatures to 37 and 35 °C.

Also pay attention to your burner configuration, the flame front moves rather quickly, generally requiring a high flow speed of the Hydrogen.

Cheers,
Tom
 

Related to Optimizing Hydrogen Combustion Catalysts for Efficient Stove Design

1. What is a hydrogen combustion catalyst?

A hydrogen combustion catalyst is a substance that speeds up the chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen, resulting in the release of energy in the form of heat. It is used in fuel cells and other hydrogen-powered technologies to improve efficiency and reduce emissions.

2. How does a hydrogen combustion catalyst work?

A hydrogen combustion catalyst works by lowering the activation energy required for the reaction between hydrogen and oxygen to occur. This allows the reaction to happen more quickly and efficiently, resulting in a more complete combustion process and increased energy output.

3. What are the benefits of using a hydrogen combustion catalyst?

The use of a hydrogen combustion catalyst can lead to several benefits, including increased energy efficiency, reduced emissions of pollutants, and longer lifespan of fuel cells and other hydrogen-powered technologies. It can also help to decrease the cost of hydrogen production and make it a more viable alternative to fossil fuels.

4. What types of materials are commonly used as hydrogen combustion catalysts?

Some common materials used as hydrogen combustion catalysts include platinum, palladium, nickel, and cobalt. These metals are often supported on a carrier material, such as carbon or alumina, to increase their surface area and improve their catalytic activity.

5. Are there any potential drawbacks or limitations to using a hydrogen combustion catalyst?

One potential limitation of using a hydrogen combustion catalyst is the high cost of some of the materials used, such as platinum and palladium. Additionally, the catalyst may become less effective over time due to contamination or deactivation. However, ongoing research and development in this field aim to address these challenges and improve the efficiency and durability of hydrogen combustion catalysts.

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