Paralell and series cicuits HELP

  • Thread starter raa849
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Series
In summary, this statement is correct- the parallel has a greater current because both resistors are connected to the source instead of the series because there is only one connection with the series.
  • #1
raa849
5
0

Homework Statement



"two identical loads in parallel have a greater total current than when they are connected in series"

we have to prove this statement right or wrong.

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Welcome to PF.

So what are your thoughts on it?
 
  • #3
please? anyone?
 
  • #4
raa849 said:
please? anyone?

You are required to do the work. We do not do your homework/coursework for you. Pleae re-read the Rules link at the top of the page, and then come back here and post your thoughts and an attempt at a solution. Then we can offer some hints and tutorial thoughts.
 
  • #5
1. Homework Statement

"two identical loads in parallel have a greater total current than when they are connected in series"

and we have to prove this statement right or wrong


2. Homework Equations



3. The Attempt at a Solution

this statement is right ...the parallel has a greater current because both resistors are connected to the source instead of the series because there is only one connection with the series
 
  • #6
raa849 said:
1. Homework Statement

"two identical loads in parallel have a greater total current than when they are connected in series"

and we have to prove this statement right or wrong


2. Homework Equations



3. The Attempt at a Solution

this statement is right ...the parallel has a greater current because both resistors are connected to the source instead of the series because there is only one connection with the series


Thank you, that's better. I think you'll need to give a more rigerous proof to get full credit on your problem, though. First of all, is it only supposed to apply to resistors as the "Loads"? That makes it easier if it does. If not, you can still use the term Z for a generalized impedance load.

I think it would help your proof if you wrote out the series and parallel combination equations for resistors. Call the resistors R (they are equal in this problem). Then compare the two equations mathematically, showing that one is always bigger than the other, except for the degenerate case when they are both zero.
 
  • #7
http://hades.mech.northwestern.edu/wiki/images/5/51/Series_parallel_resistors.gif


ok! yes an equation will really be able to prove the statement right.
i hope my picture above turns out right. is this the type of equation your talking about.

but instead use:

series
resistance total= R1+R2

parallel
resistance total = (1/R1+1/R2)-1


what number could i use so that parallel resistance is more. would i just use any numbers?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #8
Since the individual loads are the same, you might compare what the equivalent load is in the equations you cite, showing numerically that one is greater than the other.
 
  • #9
No, that is actually not the formula for parallel resistance!
 
  • #10
how does this sound?

There are two very simple circuits, a simple circuit and a parallel circuit. In a parallel circuit, each load is directly connected to the power source. The voltage is equal across all components in the circuit. In a series circuit, the current must flow through one load to get to the next load. So the amount of current is the same through all the resisters.
The statement, “Two identical loads in a parallel have a greater total current than when they were connected in series” can be proven correct by using the Junction Rule. The junction rule says that resisters in series have the same current and resisters in parallel have the same voltage drop. So it is true that the total current will be greater for the entire circuit if the loads are connected in parallel because the resistance of the current drops when a parallel arrangement is used. By using Ohms law we can find the resistance for both series and parallel circuits. For series circuits, resistance = R1+R2+R3...etc. But for parallel circuits, total resistance = 1/R1+1/R2+1/R3...etc.
 
  • #11
raa849 said:
But for parallel circuits, total resistance = 1/R1+1/R2+1/R3...etc.

That sentence is not correct.
 
  • #12
The picture provided shows the correct formula.

Perhaps the exponent-1 is being forgotten?
 
  • #13
You have no way of knowing one way or the other? :biggrin:
 

Related to Paralell and series cicuits HELP

1. What is the difference between parallel and series circuits?

In a parallel circuit, the components are connected in such a way that there are multiple paths for the current to flow. In a series circuit, the components are connected one after the other, creating a single path for the current to flow.

2. How do I calculate the total resistance in a parallel circuit?

To calculate the total resistance in a parallel circuit, you use the formula: 1/Rt = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + ... + 1/Rn. Rt represents the total resistance and R1, R2, R3, etc. represent the individual resistances of each component.

3. What happens to the overall resistance in a series circuit?

In a series circuit, the overall resistance increases as more components are added. This is because the current must pass through each component, resulting in a higher total resistance.

4. What is the relationship between voltage and current in a parallel circuit?

In a parallel circuit, the voltage across each component is the same, while the current is divided among the components. This means that the total current in the circuit is equal to the sum of the currents in each branch.

5. Can I have both parallel and series components in the same circuit?

Yes, it is possible to have a combination of parallel and series components in the same circuit. This is known as a complex circuit and can be analyzed using a combination of the rules for parallel and series circuits.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
20
Views
648
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
26
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
24
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
Back
Top