Parents force me study Engineering instead of Maths -- Help?

In summary, the conversation is about a 19-year-old freshman from Egypt who is considering changing their major from engineering to mathematics due to their passion for the subject. However, they are unsure because there are limited job opportunities for mathematicians in their country and their parents are worried about their future prospects. The expert suggests that the student should have a realistic plan before pursuing mathematics and consider the best long-term opportunities.
  • #1
enrev91
4
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I am a 19 year-old freshman from Egypt. There are no double majors here, attending university is free but I live my parents and second jobs don't pay enough for me to live on my own.
I love Maths much more than Engineering and I don't like the very applied way they teach Maths in the Engineering department. I tried to convince them but they wouldn't accept. And to some extent they have a point as other than university jobs there are very little opportunities for mathematicians here.
I am thinking of changing my major first then shock them with the news. I don't know. I am good at engineering subjects but I study them out of necessity and not passion.
Thank you.
 
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  • #2
This seems more like a relations issue than requiring academic guidance. You seem pretty clear on what you want. I will say this though, your parents are likely worried for your future prospects, which is understandable, but not a reason to put them in front of a done thing. The best thing would probably be to sit down with them and explain to them your reasons and also listen to their arguments - they might have good ones and you should show that you are willing to listen. If in the end you still want to do maths, explain that you have taken their council into consideration, but you would not be happy doing engineering. If they are reasonable, they should accept that.
 
  • #3
enrev91 said:
I am a 19 year-old freshman from Egypt. There are no double majors here, attending university is free but I live my parents and second jobs don't pay enough for me to live on my own.
I love Maths much more than Engineering and I don't like the very applied way they teach Maths in the Engineering department. I tried to convince them but they wouldn't accept. And to some extent they have a point as other than university jobs there are very little opportunities for mathematicians here.
I am thinking of changing my major first then shock them with the news. I don't know. I am good at engineering subjects but I study them out of necessity and not passion.
Thank you.

I tend to agree with your parents. If it's true that there are very little opportunities for mathematicians, then you should probably not go into mathematics. Sure, if you do mathematics you'll have fun studying it for 4 to 6 years. But then what? You need to think of the future. You need to get a realistic plan before you study mathematics. If you can get such a realistic plan, then perhaps studying mathematics is not a bad choice. But otherwise, I think you should go for the major that will give you the best opportunities in the long run.
 
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1. Why do your parents want you to study engineering instead of math?

There could be a variety of reasons why your parents are pushing you towards engineering instead of math. Some common reasons may include job stability, financial security, or personal interest in the field.

2. Can you convince your parents to let you study math instead?

It may be possible to have a conversation with your parents and explain your passion for math and why it is important to you. However, ultimately the decision may be up to them and it's important to respect their wishes.

3. What is the difference between studying engineering and math?

Engineering is a practical and applied field that utilizes mathematical principles to solve real-world problems. Math, on the other hand, is a more theoretical and abstract discipline that focuses on concepts and theories.

4. Will studying engineering limit your career options?

Not necessarily. Although engineering is a specialized field, it can lead to a wide range of career opportunities in various industries such as technology, construction, healthcare, and more. Plus, having a strong foundation in math can also open doors for other career paths.

5. How can you find a balance between your parents' wishes and your own interests?

It's important to have open and honest communication with your parents about your goals and aspirations. Consider finding a compromise where you can study both engineering and math, or find ways to incorporate your love for math into your engineering studies. Ultimately, finding a balance between your parents' wishes and your own interests may require compromise and understanding from both parties.

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