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People not interested in science?

  1. Dec 3, 2013 #1
    Ok question, it seems to me that now a days people are not interested in science. In my highschool just hate science and math and I dont understand why, so my question is why are people hating on math and science :(?
     
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  3. Dec 3, 2013 #2

    Pythagorean

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    I'm surrounded by people that are interested in science. Many of them have made careers out of it. So it's probably just a matter of where you are and who you know.

    Also, in high school, not many people are interested in normal things; it's a bit of a metamorphic stage for humans.
     
  4. Dec 3, 2013 #3

    phinds

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    In the USA, depending on what study you read, somewhere between 40% and 60% of the population believes in ghosts, aliens, and angels. The vast majority of people will never use anything but the most rudimentary science and math and have no interest in them. My question back to you would be, why SHOULD they be interested in them? Pseudo-science and conspiracy theories are so much easier.

    I find this really disgusting and, like Pythagorean, I personally spend most of my time with people who DO like math and science but when I go to Walmart I'm pretty sure the folks there couldn't make correct change without their automatic registers.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2013 #4

    SteamKing

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    Studying math and science is hard; playing with your phone and hanging out with your friends are soooo much easier.
     
  6. Dec 3, 2013 #5
    TFNdashTDrY‎[/youtube] Edit: the vi...nk- [url]www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3pYRn5j7oI‎
    (Don't know about you...)
    Edit2: the transcript with relevant lines:
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  7. Dec 3, 2013 #6

    DrDu

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    Same here in Germany.
    In former times there were much more people doing experiments at home, were programming or doing electronic circuitery.
    Today if you buy some ml of hydrogen peroxide, you already risk an anti terrorism squad taking your house.
    I see a general tendency in western societies to narrow science as science done by professional research organizations like universities. This goes in hand with restricting the freedom of science and education.
    Even teachers at high schools can't do any more many of the experiments I was shown or doing in class as a pupil.
    I think this ultimately started with the Manhattan project when science was beginning to be seen both as a potential threat and as only achievable in large projects.
    Subsequently, department structures were implemented also at most universities in Europe and organizations like CERN or the NASA were created.
     
  8. Dec 3, 2013 #7
    It makes me so mad. PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO PUT EFFORT INTO THEIR EDUCATION, honestly I can't say I'm perfect heck I slack off and sometimes get lazy but in the end I'm willing to put in the work and I get good marks. I'm trying to learn calculus way before my peers not because I want to try to act smart but because it genuinely interests me. I know a lot more then all my peers (not trying to come off with a superiority complex or anything like that) but thats because I get curious I could spend hours and hours looking at engineering textbooks, studying physics looking at how particle accelerators works, learning about what the universe is made of ,the world is a beautiful place and it gets a heck of a lot more beautiful when you look at it through the eyes of a physicist or biologist or chemist and people dont want to they are fine with doing the bare minimum.

    Sorry for the long winded paragraph but sheesh its so enraging.

    P.S sorry for any grammar errors typed that fast.
     
  9. Dec 3, 2013 #8

    WannabeNewton

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    People have different interests and they can choose to have a lack of interest in whatever they want. Do you have a precocious interest in literature, art, music, and/or journalism? Don't judge other people for their lack of interest in something you deem important.
     
  10. Dec 3, 2013 #9
    Yeah I guess that's true, I mean what i find cool other people might find lame but I understand that different strokes for different folks but I think it should make people kind of curious to find out why they're here no?
     
  11. Dec 3, 2013 #10

    WannabeNewton

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    A lot of people have more important problems in their lives than worrying about why they're here; if you're interested in physics and math then good for you but don't berate people who aren't. The same exact people can berate you for a lack of interest in something else. How would you feel then?
     
  12. Dec 3, 2013 #11
    Yeah I guess you are right, I probably sound like a nut now haha.... What I am saying isn't applying to everyone though what I'm trying to apply this to is people who only concern themselves with garbage. This current generation which I'm apart of there is people caring more about celebrity gossip and who's dating who then things that actually better society I tried to talk to a group of people about the recent launch to the moon and how China is working on its space program but they didn't even know it happened.

    To add to this. I understand being on a physics forum my view on the world is obviously biased towards an opinion or a general idea, but this generation is lazy, people end up not trying and after they graduate they end up in jobs they hate where they work a crappy job just because they didn't apply themselves. I couldn't care less about what people do and what interests them. I mean I probably realize that it came off as people who dont do science or math as their career is not applying themselves yada yada yada, but as the conversation evolves I want you to know my opinion might not have came off a right way haha.

    P.S take none of this to heart I'm just expressing my views. :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  13. Dec 3, 2013 #12

    Office_Shredder

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    Calling Generation Y lazy is easy but there's very little evidence that it's true as far as I can tell. All the media likes to complain about how people in their teens and 20s waste all their time on facebook, but

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/29/weekinreview/29graduates.html?_r=0

    is a good counterpoint to the prevailing view.

    So my opinion now is studies or it didn't happen.
     
  14. Dec 3, 2013 #13
    "Takes all kinds of people to make up a world"
    - Kurt Vonnegut
     
  15. Dec 3, 2013 #14

    SteamKing

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    DrDu makes an important point. The exposure to science for kids now is much different than it was for kids who grew up thirty or forty years ago. For one thing, there are more distractions with electronics besides television: there are computer games, phones, social media, all sorts of stuff which was science fiction back then or not even heard of. Nowadays, kids take all this stuff for granted and don't realize that most of it did not exist as few as twenty years ago. When was the last time you stumbled across a chemistry set which you could take home and do experiments without getting a permit from the EPA? When was the last time you saw an erector set which had steel parts with all kinds of sharp edges and enough teeny-tiny screws and nuts to choke an entire pre-school? A lot of kids today follow time schedules as rigid as those for any adult who is working and there is not a lot of spare time in the schedule for goofing around with stuff.
     
  16. Dec 3, 2013 #15
    Do you think that the limiting of this home science makes it not worth it and thus makes people not follow their curious side of science ?
     
  17. Dec 3, 2013 #16
    Thats why I dont like the openended courses in highschool.. I ask a question as to why something is the way it is and the teacher will say "dont worry about about it" or the famous line "you will learn that in grade 12"

    This was addressed to the "if you are asking question at the end of a lesson or course"
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  18. Dec 3, 2013 #17

    SteamKing

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    I think that those kids who have an insatiable curiosity about things will do just fine. The kids who are just plugging along, following their kid careers, may not find or get the chance to do something out of the ordinary, which might set them onto a different path in life.
     
  19. Dec 3, 2013 #18
    This is kinda unrelated but what home project do you find the most fun? For me it was an electrolysis machine :)
     
  20. Dec 3, 2013 #19
    To keep it back on topic, I hear a lot from my friends on how they think science and math is all memorization, while that is true IN certain circumstances most of math and science is understanding WHY things are the way they are or WHY we use that equation to find out this "thing".

    Do you think that science and math get a bad rep for being subjects where you have to memorize ?
     
  21. Dec 3, 2013 #20

    WannabeNewton

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    Not that I know of. If anything, subjects like biology have the bad rep with regards to memorization.
     
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