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Perfectly inelastic collision (distance)

  1. Dec 12, 2007 #1
    Lets say an object with an initial velocity collides with a still object. Collision is perfectly inelastic and the surface is frictionless. How can i know how far it traveled?
    I solved for the sum of P final = the sum of P initial, but then i dont know how to relate to distance, all i have is velocity.
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 12, 2007 #2
    I have the same problem, but my problem has an upward slope of 37 degrees that the objects (connected after collision) travel up. I wish i knew how to do this!
  4. Dec 12, 2007 #3
    First you need to determine what will slow down the combined mass system. If there is nothing acting against the motion, then the motion will not stop. Once you've determined the net force acting on the system, you can determine the acceleration of the system, and using your newfound velocity, you can find the distance travelled.
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