Permanent magnet trapped inside a superconductor

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential effects of placing a permanent magnet inside a material in a superconducting state. It is suggested that the superconductor would confine the magnetic field from the magnet to its interior, potentially with some flux penetration in Type-II superconductors. The possibility of the magnet breaking the superconducting state is also mentioned.
  • #1
jreelawg
126
0
I was wondering what it would be like if you had a permanent magnet inside the core of a material capable of obtaining the superconducting state. And you cooled it down so that it becomes a superconductor.

Assuming it didn't explode; would it just condense the magnetic field into some contained ball? What about the portion of the field outside of the superconductor? Would that get squelched off? Where would it go?
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The superconductor would compensate the magnetic field from the permanent magnet and therefore confine the field to the interior of it, maybe with some flux penetration in Type-II superconductors.
This assumes that the field is not strong enough to break the superconducting state.
 

Related to Permanent magnet trapped inside a superconductor

1. How does a permanent magnet become trapped inside a superconductor?

A permanent magnet can become trapped inside a superconductor through a process called flux pinning. This occurs when the magnetic field of the permanent magnet induces small currents in the superconductor, creating a counteracting magnetic field that locks the magnet in place.

2. Can a permanent magnet be removed from a superconductor once it is trapped?

Yes, it is possible to remove a permanent magnet from a superconductor. However, it requires a significant amount of force or a change in temperature to disrupt the flux pinning effect and release the magnet.

3. What are the potential applications of trapping a permanent magnet inside a superconductor?

One potential application is in superconducting levitation, where the trapped magnet can be used to suspend objects in mid-air. This technology has been used in high-speed trains and magnetic bearings for machinery. Other potential applications include energy storage and propulsion systems.

4. How does the strength of the permanent magnet affect its trapping in a superconductor?

The strength of the permanent magnet does not have a direct impact on its trapping in a superconductor. However, a stronger magnet may require a higher temperature or stronger magnetic field to be released from the superconductor.

5. Are there any limitations or disadvantages to trapping a permanent magnet inside a superconductor?

One limitation is that the superconductor must be kept at a very low temperature in order to maintain its superconducting state and keep the magnet trapped. Additionally, the process of trapping and releasing the magnet can be energy-intensive and may cause wear and tear on the superconductor.

Similar threads

  • Electromagnetism
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
700
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Electromagnetism
3
Replies
74
Views
12K
Replies
3
Views
667
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
8
Views
1K
Back
Top