PhD in electronics engineering, where, why

In summary: However, once you finish your degree, your earnings potential is usually significantly higher than someone who did not pursue a higher degree. Therefore, it can be a good investment if your passion lies in research or teaching. Ultimately, it's up to your personal goals and interests.
  • #1
w.shockley
21
0
Hi, I'm an italian electronics engineer. I got the bachelor degree, and the next year I'll get the master degree.
Electronics and Physics fascinate me. I'd like to work in the research environment, but I'm not sure about this choice.
In Italy the situation for researchers is not good (see brain drain).
Additionally, in Italy (i don't know if also in other countries) a company sees a PhD like a waste of time, it's not considered as an added value.
I'd like to know where the researcher job is remunerative, and let me know what you advise me to do.
 
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  • #2
Then come to USA or Canada
 
  • #3
how much a PhD is paid from univerisity, in USA?
 
  • #4
Or into Germany, France, the UK, even Poland.

Most places, your stipend (assuming you get one) usually allows you to cover your living expenses. Usually.
 
  • #5
So,
a PhD is a waste of time (and money)?
 
  • #6
Depends if you're really interested in what you're studying.
 
  • #7
Who said the Ph.D. is a waste of time and money? If your passion is in research or teaching, then you should pursue a Ph.D. However, you (usually) don't go into academia for the money, and you're usually not going to be making very much while you're pursuing your Ph.D.

AFTER your Ph.D. (or Master's) will you make more in industry than someone who didn't go to graduate school? Usually. Massively more? No (unless you have some really specialized knowledge, or something you came up with in academia got patented or bought up). I don't know what you mean by 'remunerative' research jobs, but if that's your primary motivation, I'd say you should probably go into industry.

EDIT: That's the near-universal graduate student experience: short of having a massive scholarship or two, or industrial collaboration where you get paid engineering wages by a company, you're usually not making very much (though it's usually enough to live on).
 
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Related to PhD in electronics engineering, where, why

What is a PhD in electronics engineering?

A PhD in electronics engineering is an advanced degree that focuses on research and development in the field of electronics. It typically involves a deep understanding of electrical systems, circuit design, and computer software and hardware.

Where can I pursue a PhD in electronics engineering?

Many universities around the world offer PhD programs in electronics engineering. Some top universities known for their research in this field include Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Stanford University, and University of California, Berkeley.

Why should I consider getting a PhD in electronics engineering?

A PhD in electronics engineering can open up many career opportunities in industries such as telecommunications, aerospace, and defense. It also allows for a deeper understanding and contribution to the development of new technologies and innovations in the field.

What are the requirements for a PhD in electronics engineering?

The specific requirements for a PhD in electronics engineering may vary depending on the university and program. Generally, applicants are expected to have a strong background in mathematics and computer science, as well as a bachelor's and/or master's degree in a related field.

How long does it take to complete a PhD in electronics engineering?

A PhD in electronics engineering typically takes 4-5 years to complete. This includes completing coursework, conducting research, and writing and defending a dissertation. However, the length of the program may vary depending on the individual's progress and the requirements of the university.

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