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Photoionization what will happen to compounds?

  1. Oct 18, 2011 #1
    photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    1) when UV light falls on molecules such as SiO or Fe2O3,will photo electric effect take place or will the they ionize into ions or both?? does this depend on any factor like maybe the wavelength of light being used??

    2)how will positive ions be affected by the UV light??will they give photo electrons too??

    i tried to google this several times and in several ways but found nothing...plz help....
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2011 #2

    mathman

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    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    Photography the old fashioned way - film.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2011 #3
    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    @mathman
    ??? sorry dint get u....
     
  5. Oct 18, 2011 #4
    photo electric effect of positive ions

    under photo electric effect,what will happen to positive ions??
    will they also give out photo electrons??
    if yes,what is its probability??
     
  6. Oct 18, 2011 #5
    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    no one knows the answer for this??plz help.....its urgent!!
     
  7. Oct 19, 2011 #6
    Re: photo electric effect of positive ions

    It is not an experiment performed on isolated atoms. The electrons are ejected when radiation is directed at a conductive surface. As long as the frequency is high enough though it can eject electrons from a stronger binding potential.
     
  8. Oct 19, 2011 #7

    uby

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    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    the wavelength limit for the photoelectric effect is related to the work function of the material. thus, the answer to your question lies in the work function of a compound.

    defining the work function of a compound semiconductor can be non-trivial.
     
  9. Oct 19, 2011 #8

    mathman

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    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    When light hits photographic film, the chemicals undergo a change, so that after further processing an image can be produced. I do not know the details of the particular reactions.
     
  10. Oct 19, 2011 #9
    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    Homework due today? :rolleyes:
     
  11. Oct 20, 2011 #10
    Re: photo electric effect of positive ions

    what if i am flashing UV light onto a gas containing +ve ions and detecting the photo electrons??if the logic is just that as long as the frequency is high enough electrons will be ejected,do you know how i can find out the binding potential(work function) of some positive ions like fe(iii) and si(ii)....i've been trying to get this info for a while but i'm not able to....
     
  12. Oct 20, 2011 #11
    Re: photo electric effect of positive ions

    Yea, it really comes down to the binding energy of the orbital.

    There is a chart here for Si

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_binding_energy
     
  13. Oct 20, 2011 #12
    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    okay....what about positive ions??
     
  14. Oct 20, 2011 #13
    Re: photoionization...what will happen to compounds??

    actually i'm studying the working of a detector that detects meteor smoke particles...i've got to build it by mid november and i'm still stuck in its working:grumpy:
     
  15. Oct 20, 2011 #14
    Re: photo electric effect of positive ions

    oh!!!i didnt think ionization potential and work function would be the same...but i guess they would have to be...since both represent the energy required to remove an electron...
    thanks for the help :smile:
     
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