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Physics recoil/friction problem?

  1. Oct 8, 2011 #1
    Can Anybody Help me with this physics problem?
    A skiier stars from rest at the top of the hill. As he skiies down the hill he fires a 30-06 with a uzzle velocity of 835m/s ata the bottom of the valley in the direction of motion. He has just enough energy to reach the top of the second hill(8.74 m lower than the first) and come to a stop. The distance he travels is 100m. What is the coefficient of friction of the snow?

    I don't need an answers, but if anybody has seen a problem like this could you tell me the first step or equation that I would use
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 8, 2011 #2

    vela

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    What's a 30-06?
     
  4. Oct 8, 2011 #3
    its a gun.............the bullet has a velocity of 835 m/s
     
  5. Oct 8, 2011 #4

    Dick

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    Right, it's a thirty-aught-six. This a conservation of momentum and energy problem. But there's not nearly enough information given there to solve it. You'll need the mass of the skier and the mass of the projectile at least. Then I think you can get a force of friction. But to get a coefficient of friction, I think you'll also need the slope of the ski track. It doesn't look like a complete problem to me.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2011 #5
    the mass of the skiier is 7500 times the mass of the bullet. but this is a complete problem. please help?
     
  7. Oct 9, 2011 #6

    Dick

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    Start trying to solve it. Say the height of the first hill is h and the skier's mass is m. If you ignore friction what's the velocity of the skier at the bottom of the hill? Use conservation of energy. How much is the velocity after the bullet is fired? Use conservation of momentum to do that. Compare that with the velocity required to climb the second hill. Doesn't stuff depend on m and h in ways that don't cancel out?
     
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