Polarization in laterally moving reference frame

In summary, when an observer moves from left to right, the ##45^\circ## orientation of the detector and the polarization of the photons will change due to the Lorentz transformation. The horizontal dimension will be compressed, increasing the angle to the horizontal for both the detector and the polarization of the photons. However, the observer will still predict 100% detection as the direction of the photon's polarization remains the same as the orientation of the detector.
  • #1
Imagine that you are sending photons that are polarized at ##45^\circ##, towards a detector that you are facing (e.g. the detectors's input face is parallel to your device/computer screen right now). The detector's polarization axis is also oriented at ##45^\circ##, so all the photons are registered.

An observer is moving from your left to your right. Would the ##45^\circ## orientation of the detector be something different in this observer's frame? Would the photons' polarization be different? (Obviously, both would have to change in such a way that the observer's physics would predict 100% detection -- how would that work out?)
 
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  • #2
Because of the Lorentz transformation, the horizontal dimension will be compressed in the observer's frame, while the vertical dimension will be unchanged.

That will increase the angle to the horizontal of the polarisation and detector directions, as measured in the observer's frame of reference, from 45 to something steeper, say d degrees with d>45.

But since the direction of the photon polarisation remains equal to that of the polariser - although both have changed from 45 to d degrees - the observer will still predict that all photons will be registered.
 

1. What is meant by "polarization" in laterally moving reference frame?

Polarization in laterally moving reference frame refers to the phenomenon where light waves become oriented in a particular direction as they pass through a moving medium. This is due to the relative motion between the medium and the observer, which causes a change in the direction of the light waves.

2. How does polarization change in a laterally moving reference frame?

In a laterally moving reference frame, the polarization of light waves can change in a number of ways. It can become more linear, elliptical, or even circular depending on the direction and speed of the moving medium. Additionally, the degree of polarization can also change, meaning the amount of alignment of the light waves in a certain direction can vary.

3. What factors affect polarization in a laterally moving reference frame?

The main factors that affect polarization in a laterally moving reference frame are the speed and direction of the moving medium, the wavelength of the light, and the angle of incidence of the light waves. These factors can all influence the degree and type of polarization that occurs.

4. How is polarization in a laterally moving reference frame measured?

Polarization in a laterally moving reference frame can be measured using a polarimeter, which is an instrument that can detect the orientation and degree of polarization of light waves. This is done by passing the light through polarizing filters and analyzing the resulting pattern of light.

5. What are the practical applications of studying polarization in laterally moving reference frame?

The study of polarization in laterally moving reference frame has many practical applications. It is used in various industries such as telecommunications, where it is used to improve signal quality and reduce interference. It is also used in medical imaging to enhance the contrast of images, and in astronomy to study the properties of distant objects such as stars and galaxies.

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