Pressure Calculations at Points A and B using Pascal's Paradox

In summary, a Pascal's paradox can be used to calculate the pressure at a certain point if the level of an open container of oil is known.
  • #1
Brownie
1
0

Homework Statement


The points of interest are at point A and B, I want to calculate the pressures at that point. I am working in gage pressure so we can ignore atmospheric pressure.

Homework Equations


P = pgh
P = sg x specific weight of water x height

The Attempt at a Solution


Attempting a first because I am stuck at a.
I used Pascal paradox. The level I am using is at the level of the open tank oil level. Left side is p1 and right is p2.

Pressure at point 1 is = 0 (as I’m working in gage pressure)

I’m stuck at point 2.

I think I would need a to solve b
 

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  • #2
Brownie said:

Homework Statement


The points of interest are at point A and B, I want to calculate the pressures at that point. I am working in gage pressure so we can ignore atmospheric pressure.

Homework Equations


P = pgh
P = sg x specific weight of water x height

The Attempt at a Solution


Attempting a first because I am stuck at a.
I used Pascal paradox. The level I am using is at the level of the open tank oil level. Left side is p1 and right is p2.

Pressure at point 1 is = 0 (as I’m working in gage pressure)

I’m stuck at point 2.

I think I would need a to solve b
You have left out a lot here, so I am going to make some assumptions:
1) The system is in equilibrium
2) The pipe is full of oil
3) The surface area in the two tanks is the same

Please let me know if those assumptions are not correct. I am not sure how you plan to use the hydrostatic paradox here because the levels in the two tanks are not equal. Let's talk about the pressure at point B. If we assume that the two tanks have the same area, then you can equate the weight of the oil in the tank on the left plus the weight of the entire atmosphere above it with the weight of the oil and air in the tank on the right. You should be able to solve for the pressure at point B.
 
  • #3
Brownie said:
I used Pascal paradox.
I agree with @tnich --- if this is Pascal's Paradox i don't see how it relates to your question.
https://sciencedemonstrations.fas.harvard.edu/presentations/pascals-paradox
upload_2018-8-24_21-26-57.png


..................................

The mental trick i'd use is to imagine myself very small, swimming through your apparatus and carrying an absolute pressure gage.

hydrostatics.jpg


old jim
 

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Related to Pressure Calculations at Points A and B using Pascal's Paradox

What is Pascal's paradox?

Pascal's paradox is a mathematical and philosophical concept that states that human beings are capable of achieving greatness and immortality through their actions, despite their limited existence in the universe.

How is Pascal's paradox applied in science?

In science, Pascal's paradox is often used to emphasize the significance and potential impact of individual actions and discoveries on the overall progress of science. It also encourages scientists to continue striving for new breakthroughs and pushing the boundaries of knowledge.

What is an example of the application of Pascal's paradox in science?

One example of the application of Pascal's paradox in science is the work of individual scientists contributing to a larger scientific theory or discovery. For instance, Albert Einstein's theory of relativity was built upon the work of previous scientists, yet his contributions had a profound and lasting impact on our understanding of the universe.

How can understanding Pascal's paradox benefit scientists?

Understanding Pascal's paradox can benefit scientists by motivating them to continue pushing the boundaries of knowledge and making new discoveries, even in the face of uncertainty and limited resources. It can also help scientists to appreciate the impact of their individual work and contributions to the greater scientific community.

Are there any criticisms of the application of Pascal's paradox in science?

Some critics argue that the application of Pascal's paradox in science can lead to an overly individualistic and romanticized view of scientific progress, overlooking the importance of collaboration and the contributions of multiple individuals and disciplines. It is also important to acknowledge the role of luck and chance in scientific discoveries, which may not align with the idea of individual greatness and immortality.

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