Primary Authors Earn Royalties from Math/Science Textbooks

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In summary, the amount one can earn as a primary author of a math/science textbook varies depending on factors such as sales and commission rates. Graduate level textbooks have a smaller audience compared to first year books. Author commission can range from 5-40% of the cover price, and higher sales can be achieved by promoting the book as required reading for courses.
  • #1
How much can one expect to earn if they are one of the primary authors of a math/science textbook? For example, my Differential Equations book is "Differential Equations: A Modeling Prospective," second edition, by Coleman and Borelli. How much money does someone earn by authoring a book like that?
 
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  • #2
Just like any other type of book, it depends on how well it sells and what your commission is.

Naturally, first year books will sell more as they are accessible to a more general audience. Graduate level textbooks have a very limited audience.

Author commission can vary significantly, depending on how you publish (ie. with a well-known publisher, vs. self-publication). My guess is that typically authors receive about 20-40% of the cover price. In some cases it may be as low as 5%.

The trick to making money at it, is to convince other professors to use your book as required reading for their courses.
 
  • #3


The amount of money an author can earn from a math/science textbook varies greatly and is dependent on a number of factors, such as the popularity and success of the book, the publisher's royalty rate, and the author's contract. It is difficult to provide a specific number as royalties can range from a few hundred dollars to thousands of dollars per year. Additionally, royalties may be paid out in different ways, such as a percentage of the book's sales or a flat fee per copy sold. It is also important to note that royalties are typically split among multiple authors for a textbook, and the primary authors may receive a larger percentage than co-authors. Ultimately, the amount an author can earn from a math/science textbook is not a set amount and can vary greatly depending on the individual circumstances.
 

1. What is a primary author?

A primary author is the main author or creator of a textbook. They are responsible for developing the content and structure of the textbook.

2. How do primary authors earn royalties from math/science textbooks?

Primary authors earn royalties from math/science textbooks through a contract with the publisher. The contract outlines the percentage of sales or profits that the author will receive for each copy of the textbook sold.

3. What is the typical royalty rate for primary authors?

The typical royalty rate for primary authors varies depending on the publisher and the success of the textbook. It can range from 10% to 15% of the sales or profits.

4. Do primary authors receive royalties for both print and digital versions of the textbook?

Yes, primary authors typically receive royalties for both print and digital versions of the textbook. However, the royalty rate may differ between the two versions.

5. Can primary authors negotiate their royalty rates?

Yes, primary authors can negotiate their royalty rates with the publisher. This is usually done before signing the contract and may depend on the author's level of experience and the success of their previous textbooks.

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