Proving Behavior of Particle in Infinite Potential: Wave Function?

In summary, the conversation discusses the behavior of a particle in an infinite potential well or "particle in a box." The question is how to describe the wave function for this situation and where to start in solving it. The person responding suggests reading the Wikipedia link provided and mentions that this is a common example used in teaching quantum mechanics. They also mention that there are subtle problems with this example, such as the inability to define a momentum operator.
  • #1
loversphisics
3
1
Hello, guys! I have a question. How can I prove the behavior of a particle subjected to an infinite potential? Will the wave function exist?
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

loversphisics said:
Hello, guys! I have a question. How can I prove the behavior of a particle subjected to an infinite potential? Will the wave function exist?
Do you mean like a particle in a box? A particle in an infinite potential well? Can you be more specific? Thanks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_in_a_box
 
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  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to PF.Do you mean like a particle in a box? A particle in an infinite potential well? Can you be more specific? Thanks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_in_a_box
Yes! It´s like a particle in a box. Do you how can i describe the wave function to this exemple ? Where do i start to solve this question ?
 
  • #4
loversphisics said:
Yes! It´s like a particle in a box. Do you how can i describe the wave function to this exemple ? Where do i start to solve this question ?
Did you read the Wikipedia link that I posted? That should answer your question pretty well.
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
Did you read the Wikipedia link that I posted? That should answer your question pretty well.
IMG! I hadn't seen the link above. I'll read it and anything I'll come here. Thank you very much.
 
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  • #6
Wave functions are interesting. Even more so their collapse.
 
  • #7
Another common term for this situation is "infinite square well." If you Google for this phrase you will find many lecture notes about it. I think almost every introduction to quantum mechanics by way of Schrödinger's equation starts with this example. :smile:
 
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  • #8
Yes, and almost any introduction hides the subtle problems of this only apparently simple example. E.g., you cannot define a momentum operator but its square (and thus the Hamiltonian used to define the model)...
 
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