Proving Liebniz's Rule by Induction: Stuck at p(n+1)

In summary, Liebniz's Rule, also known as the Generalized Product Rule, is a mathematical theorem used in calculus to find the derivative of a product of two functions. It is an important tool in solving real-world problems. Induction is a method of mathematical proof used to show a statement is true for all natural numbers, and it is utilized in proving Liebniz's Rule. The main difficulty in using induction to prove Liebniz's Rule is finding the correct form of the induction hypothesis. Some common mistakes to avoid when using induction are assuming the induction hypothesis must be in the same form as the statement being proved, using the wrong base case, and not showing the statement holds for the base case. Tips for successfully proving Lie
  • #1
barksdalemc
55
0
I have to prove Liebniz's Rule by induction. So the p(1) is just the product rule. I am assuming the p(n) is true. Now when I expand the series for p(n+1) I am stuck. I think I need to collect the terms in the n+1 expansion and show that they are just one term expansion more than the n expansion but I am not getting how.
 
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  • #2
If you differentiate something n+1 times, then you've differentiated it n times, then once more, haven't you?
 
  • #3
Wow. I can't believe that's it. Thanks.
 

Related to Proving Liebniz's Rule by Induction: Stuck at p(n+1)

What is Liebniz's Rule and why is it important?

Liebniz's Rule, also known as the Generalized Product Rule, is a mathematical theorem that allows us to find the derivative of a product of two functions. It is an important tool in calculus and is used to solve many real-world problems.

What is induction and how does it relate to Liebniz's Rule?

Induction is a method of mathematical proof where we show that a statement is true for all natural numbers by first proving it for a base case (usually n=1) and then showing that if it holds for n, it must also hold for n+1. In the case of proving Liebniz's Rule, we use induction to prove that the rule holds for all natural numbers n.

What is the main difficulty in proving Liebniz's Rule using induction?

The main difficulty in proving Liebniz's Rule using induction is finding the correct form of the induction hypothesis. This involves carefully examining the pattern of derivatives for each natural number n and using this information to form a hypothesis that can be proved for n+1.

What are some common mistakes to avoid when using induction to prove Liebniz's Rule?

One common mistake is assuming that the induction hypothesis must be in the same form as the statement we are trying to prove. Another mistake is using the wrong base case or not showing that the statement holds for the base case. It is also important to be careful with algebraic manipulations and to make sure that each step is justified.

Are there any tips for successfully proving Liebniz's Rule by induction?

Yes, here are a few tips: 1) carefully examine the pattern of derivatives for each natural number and use this to form a hypothesis, 2) make sure to show that the statement holds for the base case, 3) keep track of your algebraic manipulations and make sure each step is justified, and 4) if you get stuck, try approaching the problem from a different angle or seeking help from a colleague or professor.

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