Pyrex glass rod is immersed into wesson oil

In summary, the conversation discusses the math behind the bending of light when a pyrex glass rod is immersed in wesson oil. The concept of Snell's Law is suggested to understand the angle of light rays passing through the rod and the oil. It is also explained that the rod becomes "invisible" due to the equal refraction of light, while bubbles are visible because of the difference in the refraction of light passing through them.
  • #1
henry2221
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  • #2
henry2221 said:
I want to show the math of what happens when the pyrex glass rod is immersed into wesson oil making the bend in light identical, but I don't know where to start? Suggestions? Or equations you believe I should focus on?

Have you had Snell's Law yet? If so, consider the angle that a light ray makes to the normal to the surface of the rod both before entering the glass and after, when the index of refraction is the same on both sides of the surface. How does that differ from how the light ray travels in simply passing through the oil?
 
  • #3
dynamicsolo said:
Have you had Snell's Law yet? If so, consider the angle that a light ray makes to the normal to the surface of the rod both before entering the glass and after, when the index of refraction is the same on both sides of the surface. How does that differ from how the light ray travels in simply passing through the oil?

No, but I've googled it and found out the relation that:

refraction1 * angle1 = refraction2 * angle2


refraction1 / refraction2 = wave velo.2 / wave velo.1

thus if the refraction of two things are equal where

refractoin1 = refraction2

thus it having both equal each other the thing would equal 1=1 which causes no bend in light... however this does not explain why it looks to be invisible? for example why are bubbles visible when it itself is a clear object without color? someone please explain...
 
  • #4
henry2221 said:
... having both equal each other the thing would equal 1=1 which causes no bend in light... however this does not explain why it looks to be invisible? for example why are bubbles visible when it itself is a clear object without color? someone please explain...

The rod becomes "invisible" because there is no change in the direction of the light rays passing from the oil to the glass and back out to the oil, just as if there were no rod there at all. (Actually, slight variations in the refraction just at the surface where the oil density is disturbed by the presence of the rod will allow the edges of the rod to be just discernible.)

The difference with bubbles is that they are not solid objects, but "chambers" filled with air, surrounded by the fluid (water or whatever). So light will be passing from the fluid (with some index of refraction n > 1) to the air within the bubble (n very nearly equal to 1) and back into the fluid. The path of the light ray is disturbed, so you are able to see bubbles.
 

Related to Pyrex glass rod is immersed into wesson oil

1. What is Pyrex glass?

Pyrex glass is a type of borosilicate glass that is known for its durability and resistance to thermal shock. It is commonly used in laboratory and kitchen settings due to its ability to withstand high temperatures and sudden changes in temperature without breaking.

2. What is a glass rod?

A glass rod is a cylindrical piece of glass that is used for stirring, mixing, or transferring small amounts of liquids or solids in laboratory experiments. It is typically made of borosilicate glass, like Pyrex, to ensure its durability and resistance to thermal shock.

3. What happens when a Pyrex glass rod is immersed into Wesson oil?

When a Pyrex glass rod is immersed into Wesson oil, it will appear to disappear or become transparent. This is because the refractive indices of Pyrex glass and Wesson oil are similar, causing the light to pass through without any noticeable refraction. This phenomenon is known as immersion matching.

4. Why is it important to use Pyrex glass for this experiment?

It is important to use Pyrex glass for this experiment because it is resistant to thermal shock and will not break when exposed to high temperatures or sudden changes in temperature. This ensures the safety of the experimenter and the accuracy of the results. Additionally, Pyrex glass is chemically inert, meaning it will not react with the Wesson oil or any other substances being used in the experiment.

5. Can other types of glass be used instead of Pyrex?

Other types of glass can be used instead of Pyrex, but they may not have the same level of durability and resistance to thermal shock. This could potentially lead to the glass breaking and causing harm to the experimenter or affecting the accuracy of the results. It is recommended to use Pyrex glass or another type of borosilicate glass for this experiment to ensure safety and accuracy.

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