Quitting full time job prematurely?

  • Other
  • Thread starter Jese James
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Job Time
In summary: Have you talked to your new employer about doing non-classified work for them until your security clearance is granted? Yes. Often times, you can spend this time getting familiar with the company, doing training and whatnot, until you are able to work on the classified stuff. Even if you're doing nothing but being a go-fer, you build up seniority at this company without going thru the hassle of finding another temporary position, which you're going to quit when things work out.
  • #1
I graduated with a masters degree in computer engineering this year and I have a good job lined up with a defense contractor, but I am in the process of being investigated for a secret security clearance. Unfortunately, I can't start work until the government has granted me clearance, and I have financial needs such as paying for an apartment/repaying school loans. I don't want to be a financial burden to my family so I need to find a job, but finding temporary work in my field of study is difficult (aside from trying to freelance as a software developer), so i guess my question is, should I apply to full-time engineering positions for other companies and then resign when I receive my clearance anywhere from 2-4 months after starting? Or do i bite the bullet and find a low paying temp job somewhere where I won't burn any bridges?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Finding a full-time engineering position may take a few weeks anyway. So if the main problem boils down to: need cash now, you'll have to be a little more flexible with what kind of position you'll accept. There's no dishonour in taking a lower paying, less skill-intensive job to pay the bills until you can get something that's a little more inline with your skill set and career aspirations.
 
  • Like
Likes Ben Espen, Fervent Freyja and Jese James
  • #3
Choppy said:
Finding a full-time engineering position may take a few weeks anyway. So if the main problem boils down to: need cash now, you'll have to be a little more flexible with what kind of position you'll accept. There's no dishonour in taking a lower paying, less skill-intensive job to pay the bills until you can get something that's a little more inline with your skill set and career aspirations.
Thanks for the response. I just hoped that I could sharpen my skills instead of working minimum wage, but maybe the a lower skill job will give life a new pespective
 
  • #4
Jese James said:
so i guess my question is, should I apply to full-time engineering positions for other companies and then resign when I receive my clearance anywhere from 2-4 months after starting?
Burning bridges is always the last option and is totally unwarranted here.
Jese James said:
Or do i bite the bullet and find a low paying temp job somewhere where I won't burn any bridges?
Yes. Treading water for 2-4 months doing anything that brings in money is the right choice.
 
  • #5
Jese James said:
I graduated with a masters degree in computer engineering this year and I have a good job lined up with a defense contractor, but I am in the process of being investigated for a secret security clearance. Unfortunately, I can't start work until the government has granted me clearance, and I have financial needs such as paying for an apartment/repaying school loans. I don't want to be a financial burden to my family so I need to find a job, but finding temporary work in my field of study is difficult (aside from trying to freelance as a software developer), so i guess my question is, should I apply to full-time engineering positions for other companies and then resign when I receive my clearance anywhere from 2-4 months after starting? Or do i bite the bullet and find a low paying temp job somewhere where I won't burn any bridges?
Have you talked to your new employer about doing non-classified work for them until your security clearance is granted? Often times, you can spend this time getting familiar with the company, doing training and whatnot, until you are able to work on the classified stuff. Even if you're doing nothing but being a go-fer, you build up seniority at this company without going thru the hassle of finding another temporary position, which you're going to quit when things work out.
 
  • Like
Likes CalcNerd

What are the potential consequences of quitting a full time job prematurely?

Quitting a full time job prematurely can have both short-term and long-term consequences. In the short-term, you may have to deal with financial instability, loss of benefits, and difficulty finding another job. In the long-term, it can negatively impact your career progression and future job opportunities.

When is it considered premature to quit a full time job?

The definition of "premature" can vary depending on the individual and their specific situation. However, in general, it is considered premature to quit a full time job before completing at least a year of employment. This allows for enough time to assess the job and determine if it is a good fit.

What are some signs that it may be time to quit a full time job prematurely?

Some potential signs that it may be time to quit a full time job prematurely include feeling constantly stressed, unhappy, or unfulfilled in your job, experiencing a toxic work environment, or consistently being underpaid or overworked. It is important to carefully evaluate your reasons for wanting to quit and seek advice from trusted mentors or colleagues.

How can quitting a full time job prematurely affect future job prospects?

Quitting a full time job prematurely can potentially raise red flags to future employers. They may question your commitment and reliability, as well as your ability to handle difficult situations. It is important to be prepared to address the reasons for your early departure in future job interviews.

What steps should be taken before making the decision to quit a full time job prematurely?

Before making the decision to quit a full time job prematurely, it is important to carefully evaluate your reasons for wanting to leave and consider the potential consequences. It may be helpful to discuss your concerns with your employer or seek advice from a career counselor. Additionally, it is important to have a plan in place for finding another job or managing financially if you do decide to quit.

Suggested for: Quitting full time job prematurely?

Replies
6
Views
817
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
22
Views
2K
Replies
25
Views
3K
Back
Top