Alternative methods to making $$ w/ a computer science degree?

In summary: Thank you for your input!I'm still unclear on what your job is but if you specialize in computer science and you are interested in unsolved mathematical equations, there is a million dollar reward for solving any of...those equations.
  • #1
tensor0910
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Ok, so here's where I am at:

I'll be 35 this year. Was an engineering major way back when, but switched to comp. sci. and enjoying it very much. I should graduate in 2-2.5 years. Its all paid for through the company I work for now. I'm set.
Except...I like where I'm at. I have a decent paying job that I'm good at. I am in a union so our raises are automatic. I work 40 hrs. no more, no less. In 2 years I'll be up to approx.$37.00/hr. Not the most, but nothing to shake a stick at.
My question is...are there any ways I can utilize my degree for $$ while keeping my current job? Freelance programmer for hire? part-time cybercrime detective? ( just kidding... sort of ). Any/all suggestions are appreciated. I shoudl mention that the current field I am in has zero to do with computers.
 
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  • #2
Well, there's probably more money in cybercrime than catching cyber-criminals. Just sayin'...

Sure, you can freelance. It's not as easy as it sounds, though - a lot of time is spent "marketing" for lack of a better term. Hustling for work is as much a part of the job as the work itself.
 
  • #3
Why would you not talk to your/the boss, may I say, obviously?
 
  • #4
sysprog said:
Why would you not talk to your/the boss, may I say, obviously?

Thank you for the reply.

Not quite sure what there is to talk about. My current industry is hands-on work. I wouldn't be using my degree if I stuck around.
 
  • #5
tensor0910 said:
Thank you for the reply.

Not quite sure what there is to talk about. My current industry is hands-on work. I wouldn't be using my degree if I stuck around.
Would it mess with your current deal if you were to do some side work?
 
  • #6
Dumb question, why did your company pay for you to get a degree if you aren't going to use it at your work?
 
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  • #7
Office_Shredder said:
Dumb question, why did your company pay for you to get a degree if you aren't going to use it at your work?
I almost feel like asking or at least wondering the same thing. Could you do something along the lines of computer science for your current company? Any possible opportunity for a position change in your same company? Could you take on some additional role along with what your present job is at your company?
 
  • #8
That's not a bad income. I'd be patient while knocking gently on different doors and trying some new things once your degree is completed.
 
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  • #9
Office_Shredder said:
Dumb question, why did your company pay for you to get a degree if you aren't going to use it at your work?

symbolipoint said:
I almost feel like asking or at least wondering the same thing. Could you do something along the lines of computer science for your current company? Any possible opportunity for a position change in your same company? Could you take on some additional role along with what your present job is at your company?

I was about to ask the same questions as posed above.

@tensor0910 , why did your company agree to pay for your computer science degree program if they didn't expect you to use that degree in some way? Normally, companies pay employees for training or advanced degree with the expectation that those new skills will be useful to you within your company.
 
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  • #10
sysprog said:
Would it mess with your current deal if you were to do some side work?
My field is calibration. I'd need expensive equipment to do what I do. And most machinists shops repair their tools locally ( I asked ). Side work wouldn't be a problem. Using company equipment to do so...yeah.

Thank you for the reply!
 
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  • #11
Dr. Courtney said:
That's not a bad income. I'd be patient while knocking gently on different doors and trying some new things once your degree is completed.

Thank you for the sage advice, Dr. I guess I'm just trying to make up for lost time.
 
  • #12
Office_Shredder said:
Dumb question, why did your company pay for you to get a degree if you aren't going to use it at your work?

Not dumb at all, and thank you for the response!

My job does TA for STEM and business degrees in the hopes people will stick around. I work in a cal lab, but we have departments in IT, engineering, business, etc. etc. I guess they're hoping people like me will transfer to one of those once we graduate, but I'm just trying to explore all of my options.

Thank you for the response.
 
  • #13
tensor0910 said:
My field is calibration.
...
Very unexpected name of a field based on my very (possibly) limited experience.
 
  • #14
I’m still unclear on what your job is but if you specialize in computer science and you are interested in unsolved mathematical equations, there is a million dollar reward for solving any of the worlds seven unsolved math problems (Ex: p=np, collatz conjecture, etc.)
 
  • #15
Why not look at ways to improve your job through some programming or combo of homework (raspberry pi) and programming? Is there an incentive award for better ideas? Does your company have a programming dept somewhere?

The raspberry pi is cheap as computers go. They even have an integrated pi CPU and keyboard combo. You only need to add a display, mouse, and power to have a working desktop. Perhaps, you could use it to develop a calibration system.

With your calibration experience, maybe something that would help a machinist calibrate a tool or device via steps to take, or photos of setups...

Other thoughts would be games for kids, apps for the app-store, youtube channel on programming or CS, or even machine calibration. You might hit the money depending on how entertaining it is. It's also quite consuming as many YouTubers will tell you filming and editing content can take a whole day for 20 minutes of footage.
 
  • #16
One way to explore career options in CS is to join one or more Open Source projects. These are collaborative projects where you volunteer your time and where almost anybody is permitted to contribute. You can start out with very simple assignments and work your way up. There is usually no minimum or maximum time commitment. IMO it would be much easier to find an interesting Open Source project than some kind of freelance work. If things don't work out, you can switch to a different project, and you won't have to explain to potential employers why you switched. Alternatively, you could start your own Open Source project. Maybe if you have some ideas you'd like to explore from your classes, work, or other experiences.
 
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1. What are some alternative methods to making money with a computer science degree?

Aside from traditional careers in software development or information technology, there are several alternative methods to making money with a computer science degree. Some options include freelancing, starting your own tech company, becoming a consultant, or working in a specialized field such as artificial intelligence or cybersecurity.

2. How can I use my computer science degree to make money online?

There are many ways to make money online with a computer science degree. You can offer your programming skills on freelance websites, create and sell software or apps, start a blog or YouTube channel related to technology, or even participate in online coding competitions and win cash prizes.

3. Are there any specific skills or knowledge that I need to have in order to make money with my computer science degree?

While having a strong foundation in computer science and programming is essential, there are certain skills and knowledge that can greatly increase your earning potential. These include proficiency in popular programming languages and frameworks, understanding of web development and design, knowledge of data structures and algorithms, and familiarity with emerging technologies.

4. Can I make a decent living by pursuing alternative methods with a computer science degree?

Yes, you can definitely make a decent living by pursuing alternative methods with a computer science degree. In fact, some of these methods can even be more lucrative than traditional careers in computer science. It ultimately depends on your skills, dedication, and the demand for your services in the market.

5. Are there any risks involved in pursuing alternative methods to making money with a computer science degree?

As with any career path, there are always risks involved. However, with a computer science degree, you have a strong foundation and in-demand skills that can help mitigate these risks. It is important to thoroughly research and plan your alternative methods, have a backup plan, and continuously update your skills to stay relevant in the ever-evolving tech industry.

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