Radioactive decays, different modes share

In summary, the conversation discusses the process of determining the share of different decay modes for a given nuclide activity. The example of Y-90 is used, which is known for being a beta emitter but also emits gammas and X-rays. The person is trying to assess the number of emitted electrons and gamma quanta in one hour of active isotope and the percentage of beta and gamma from the given activity. The available data from the National Nuclear Data Center shows two ways of Y-90 decaying - beta minus and gamma IT, with specific intensities for each mode. However, the person is unsure how to determine which mode is more probable to occur. They also mention the presence of two isomers for Y-90, but are
  • #1
taffer33
4
0
Hello,

I'd like someone to help me understand, how can I tell from available data, what is the approximate share of different decay modes, for some given nuclide activity.

Let's take 90Y for instance. It's known for being beta-emitter, but it emits gammas and X-rays as well. How to approximately assess what is the number of registered emitted electrons and number of emitted gamma quantum, let's say during one hour of active isotope. What will be the percentage of beta and gamma from given activity?

For example
https://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/decaysearchdirect.jsp?nuc=90Y&unc=nds

From this data I can see there are two ways of Y-90 decaying, beta minus and gamma IT. I can read the intensities for given decay modes. From the IT decay we have gammas 202,53 keV (97%) and 479,51 keV (90,7%). From the beta - almost 100% of the electrons with initial energy of 933 keV.

And now my problem is to understand this part. I have 100% intensities for one decay mode, and 100% for the another - and how can I find the information which mode is more probable to occur?
 
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  • #2
There are two isomers of Y-90 called Y-90 and Y-90m. Your two modes are one for each isomer. I can't find more information.
 
  • #3
If there is more than one decay mode you need a database that gives their relative frequencies. In this case you are comparing two different things, however.
 

Related to Radioactive decays, different modes share

What is radioactive decay?

Radioactive decay is the process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation, thereby transforming into a more stable nucleus.

What are the different modes of radioactive decay?

The different modes of radioactive decay are alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, electron capture, and positron emission. These modes determine the type of radiation emitted by the unstable nucleus.

How do different modes of radioactive decay share similarities and differences?

All modes of radioactive decay involve the emission of radiation from an unstable nucleus. However, the type and energy of the emitted radiation, as well as the resulting stable nucleus, differ depending on the decay mode.

What determines the mode of radioactive decay for a specific element?

The mode of radioactive decay for a specific element is determined by the ratio of protons to neutrons in the nucleus. Elements with an imbalance of protons and neutrons will undergo radioactive decay to achieve a more stable ratio.

What are the practical applications of understanding radioactive decay?

Understanding radioactive decay is crucial in many fields, including medicine, energy production, and environmental studies. It allows for the use of radioactive isotopes in diagnostic imaging, power generation, and dating geological samples.

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