Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen

In summary, the conversation discusses incorporating reheat and a direct contact feedwater heater for a rankine cycle steam power plant. The question is whether to bleed the high pressure or low pressure turbine for the feedwater heater and if it depends on something specific. The diagrams in the notes show steam being bled from the low pressure turbines, but the conversation concludes that it probably doesn't matter and the only factor that may affect the decision is the efficiencies of the turbines.
  • #1
atedinabox
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0
Hello, I'm working on designing a rankine cycle steam power plant for a class and am trying to incorporate both reheat and a direct contact feedwater heater for regen. I've attempted to read up on this online but beyond some basic information it's hard to find anything. My question is should I bleed the high pressure or the low pressure turbine for the FWH, or if it depends, what does it depend on? I hope this wasn't too dumb of a question, and thanks for your time.
 
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  • #2
Diagrams in my notes tend to all show steam being bled from the L.P turbines at the end - they don't explain why this is, unfortunately.

Easy answer, it probably doesn't matter. You're taking x amount of heat out of the cycle at the turbine stage, and putting it back into the feed heaters either way so I can't see the results verying. The only thing I can see it depending on is the efficiencies of the turbines.
 

Related to Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen

1. What is the Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen?

The Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen is a thermodynamic cycle used to convert heat into mechanical work. It is commonly used in steam power plants to generate electricity.

2. How does the Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen work?

The cycle begins with a high-pressure liquid entering the boiler, where it is heated to a high temperature and pressure, converting it into a vapor. The vapor then enters a turbine, where it expands and does work. The low-pressure vapor then enters a condenser, where it is condensed into a liquid and pumped back to the boiler. In the reheat+regen variation, the vapor is reheated and partially extracted from the turbine to heat the liquid entering the boiler, improving efficiency.

3. What is the purpose of reheat and regen in the Rankine Cycle?

Reheat and regen are used to improve the efficiency of the Rankine Cycle. Reheat involves reheating the vapor between stages of the turbine, which helps maintain a high temperature and pressure in the turbine, increasing its efficiency. Regen involves using extracted vapor to preheat the liquid entering the boiler, reducing the amount of energy needed to heat the liquid to its boiling point.

4. What are the advantages of using the Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen?

The main advantage of using the Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen is its improved efficiency compared to a simple Rankine Cycle. The reheat and regen processes help to reduce energy losses and increase the amount of work done by the turbine, resulting in a higher overall efficiency. This can lead to cost savings and reduced emissions in power plant operations.

5. What are some real-world applications of the Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen?

The Rankine Cycle with Reheat+Regen is commonly used in steam power plants, such as coal-fired power plants, to generate electricity. It is also used in some geothermal power plants, where hot water from underground is used to heat the working fluid in the Rankine Cycle. Additionally, the cycle is used in some industrial processes, such as in the production of paper and chemicals, to generate steam for heating and power.

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