Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a steam power plant operating on a regenerative Rankine cycle. The steam enters the turbine at 8.0 MPa and is condensed in the condenser at a pressure of 40 C. Some steam is bled at 700 kPa for feedwater heating. The conversation then introduces a home activity where the extraction of steam is at 1.2 MPa and the speaker is unsure of how to approach the problem. They ask for clarification on the meaning of extraction of steam and if they should replace any variables in the given problem with 1.2 MPa. The expert summarizer clarifies that extraction of steam refers to the removal of steam from the process and suggests that the
  • #1
Kamuna
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Misplaced Homework Thread
Summary:: regenerative rankine cycle

Im a bit troubled by my home activity recently and maybe i could use some help this is the problem :

In a steam power plant operating on regenerative Rankine cycle with one contact feedwater heater, steam enters the turbine at 8.0 MPa, 350 C and condensed in the condenser with a pressure at saturated temperature of 40 C. Some steam is bled at 700 kPa for feedwater heating. There are 27.5 kg/s of steam entering the high-pressure turbine, determine:

a. extracted steam flow per second
b. turbine work output in kW
c. thermal efficiency of the cycle
( Home Activity : If the extraction of steam is at 1.2 MPa , determine a b, & c)

My question is what is the meaning of the extraction of steam and where would i use the 1.2Mpa or should i change a variable in the given problem to 1.2Mpa? Thanks in advance
 
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  • #2
Kamuna said:
what is the meaning of the extraction of steam
extraction of steam is the opening of the valve between boiler and turbine, I would say.
Am I right in understanding this exercise was done (in class, or otherwise) with extraction at 8 MPa and now you are asked to do the same exercise at 1.2 MPa ?
 
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  • #3
BvU said:
extraction of steam is the opening of the valve between boiler and turbine, I would say.
Am I right in understanding this exercise was done (in class, or otherwise) with extraction at 8 MPa and now you are asked to do the same exercise at 1.2 MPa ?

Is this the same question as https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/regenerative-rankine-cycle.1013703/ ?

##\ ##
the 8Mpa has a solution already but our home activity was if the extraction is 1.2Mpa. So I just need to replace the 8Mpa into 1.2Mpa? I am still a bit confused in the topic so i don't know what extraction of steam means and still don't know where to replace the given
 
  • #4
Kamuna said:
dont know what extraction of steam means
Extraction, translated literally, means: removal (the taking out) from ex (out) and traction (pulling).

I wrongly said 'between boiler and turbine': it can just as well be between a turbine stage and the feed water heater.
(And must humbly admit that that is the more sensible exercise: with 12 Bar instead of 7 Bar)

Do you have a flowchart of your process at 80 Bar ? Does it look like https://www.electrical4u.com/rankine-cycle-and-re-generative-feed-heating/#:~:text=In%20a%20Rankine%20regenerative%20cycle,)%2C%20where%20it%20is%20extracted. ?

##\ ##
 
  • #5
BvU said:
Extraction, translated literally, means: removal (the taking out) from ex (out) and traction (pulling).

I wrongly said 'between boiler and turbine': it can just as well be between a turbine stage and the feed water heater.
(And must humbly admit that that is the more sensible exercise: with 12 Bar instead of 7 Bar)

Do you have a flowchart of your process at 80 Bar ? Does it look like https://www.electrical4u.com/rankine-cycle-and-re-generative-feed-heating/#:~:text=In%20a%20Rankine%20regenerative%20cycle,)%2C%20where%20it%20is%20extracted. ?

##\ ##
yep, it looked like that and thanks anyway I've already solved it it's just that the 700kpa needs to be replaced with 1.2Mpa and now I'm good so thanks again for helping me
 
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1. What is a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle?

A Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle is a thermodynamic cycle that is used to convert heat energy into mechanical work in power plants. It is a variation of the traditional Rankine cycle that utilizes a feedwater heater to improve the efficiency of the cycle.

2. How does a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle work?

A Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle works by using a series of processes to convert heat energy into mechanical work. The cycle starts with a boiler where water is heated to produce high-pressure steam. The steam then enters a turbine where it expands, producing mechanical work. The exhaust steam from the turbine then enters a condenser where it is converted back into liquid form. The liquid then enters a feedwater heater where it is preheated before entering the boiler again.

3. What are the advantages of a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle?

The main advantage of a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle is its increased efficiency compared to a traditional Rankine cycle. The use of a feedwater heater allows for more heat to be extracted from the exhaust steam, resulting in a higher temperature and pressure of the steam entering the turbine. This leads to a higher thermal efficiency and lower fuel consumption.

4. What are the limitations of a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle?

One limitation of a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle is the cost and complexity of the additional equipment required, such as the feedwater heater. This can make it less practical for smaller power plants. Additionally, the efficiency gains may not be significant enough to justify the added cost in some cases.

5. How is a Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle used in industry?

A Thermodynamics Regenerative Rankine Cycle is commonly used in large-scale power plants, particularly in the production of electricity from fossil fuels. It is also used in some industrial processes, such as in the production of steam for industrial heating and in refrigeration systems. The use of a feedwater heater allows for more efficient energy production, making it a popular choice in industries where energy efficiency is a priority.

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