Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect

In summary, the Rashba effect and spin Hall effect are both related to spin-orbit coupling. The Rashba effect is caused by an electric field perpendicular to a 2D conductor, while the spin Hall effect is caused by current in a wire inducing a magnetic field. Both effects involve the coupling of electron spins with magnetic fields, leading to a momentum dependence of the spin and opposite spins moving in different directions.
  • #1
JanSpintronics
32
2
Hello everybody,

Im looking for a good explanation for the Rashba effect or Rashba Spin Orbit coupling (when it is the same effect with 2 names?) . If somebody can help me here that would be awesome. Moreover i try to understand the intrinsic mechanism of the Spin Hall Effect with the Berry Curvature, hopefully i figured it out that this has to do with the rashba effect. If somebody can give a nice explanation that would be awesome but i also looking for a good article in a book or paper where i can find it. I already know something about Sinova but... I really don't understand it...

Greetings
 
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  • #2
Spintronics isn't really my field, but I'll give it a shot. Both the Rashba effect and the spin Hall effect have their origins in spin-orbit coupling. For the Rashba effect, the presence of an electric field perpendicular to a 2D conductor causes the electrons to experience a magnetic field, which the electron spins interact with. This leads to a momentum dependence of the spin. For the spin Hall effect, current in a wire will induce a magnetic field around that wire. The electron spins will couple with that magnetic field and this coupling will cause opposite spins to move in different directions. That's about the extent of my knowledge on that topic.
 

1. What is the Rashba-Effect and how does it differ from the Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect?

The Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect are both phenomena in condensed matter physics that involve the spin of electrons. The Rashba-Effect is a spin-orbit coupling effect that occurs in two-dimensional systems, where the spin of an electron is coupled to its momentum due to the presence of an electric field. The Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect, on the other hand, is a bulk phenomenon that occurs in three-dimensional systems, where the spin of an electron is coupled to its momentum due to the intrinsic properties of the material.

2. What causes the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect?

The Rashba-Effect is caused by the presence of an electric field in a two-dimensional system, which breaks the inversion symmetry and leads to a spin-orbit coupling between the electron's spin and momentum. The Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect, on the other hand, is caused by the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of the material in a three-dimensional system.

3. What are the potential applications of the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect?

The Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect have potential applications in spintronics, which is a field that aims to use the spin of electrons for information processing and storage. These effects can be used to manipulate and control the spin of electrons, which could lead to more efficient and faster electronic devices.

4. Can the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect be observed in all materials?

No, the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect are only observed in materials with strong spin-orbit coupling. This includes materials such as semiconductors, topological insulators, and heavy metals.

5. How do scientists study and measure the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect?

Scientists use various experimental techniques, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and spin-resolved transport measurements, to study and measure the Rashba-Effect and Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect. These techniques allow them to observe the spin and momentum of electrons and determine the strength of the spin-orbit coupling in a material.

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