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Rate of reactions vs. HEat energy evolves per second inititally

  1. Oct 22, 2012 #1
    Nitrogen dioxide reacts with carbon monoxide by the overall equation:

    NO2(g) + CO(g) ----> NO(g)+ CO2(g)

    At a particular temperature, the reaction is second order In NO2 and zero order in CO. The rate constant is 0.515 L/(mol*s). How much heat energy evolves per second initially from 3.50 L of reaction mixture containing .0250 M NO2?

    Assume the enthalpy change is constant with temperature.How much heat energy evolves per second initially from 3.50 L of reaction mixture containing .0250 M NO2?

    I figured out the rate law for this = k[NO2]^2
    The enthalpy change for NO2 is 33.1 kJ/mol
    However I don't really understand how the concentration, the volume, and the rate constant would relate to find out the heat energy?

    Should i find the number of moles of NO2 or what should I do? I totally have no idea about this!

    Any help would be highly appreciate
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2012 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    How much energy would evolve during a second if there were 1 mole of NO2 produced per second? And if there were 0.5 mole produced? And if there were n moles produced?
     
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