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Real life examples of spring energy storage

  1. Aug 11, 2014 #1

    Ryan_m_b

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    Tonight I've had a deceptively simple question that I've found maddeningly difficult to get an answer to. What I'm looking for is a list of springs with information on how much they can be compressed and how much energy they store. E.g.:

    Steel spring from company A has dimensions X, Y, Z and can be compressed U% holding Vj of energy.

    Instead though all I can find is explanations of Hooke's law and hypothetical examples. Most sites seem to assume that the person asking has a spring they want to rest and so can just figure out energy storage by piling weights on and working through Hooke's law. Whereas I'm just looking for a simple set of figures.

    Any pointers to such a fact sheet would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2014 #2

    berkeman

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    Look at garage door opener counterweight springs?
     
  4. Aug 11, 2014 #3

    Ryan_m_b

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    Do you mean google counterweight springs or go to a garage and observe on directly? I can do (and in another window currently are doing) the former but I live in a block of flats without a garage so the latter would be difficult.
     
  5. Aug 11, 2014 #4

    berkeman

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    I'd try garage door installation websites, and maybe wikipedia. Let me have a look at wikipedia...
     
  6. Aug 11, 2014 #5

    Ryan_m_b

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    Working my way through this one at the moment. Cheers for the help :smile:
     
  7. Aug 11, 2014 #6

    berkeman

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  8. Aug 11, 2014 #7

    berkeman

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  9. Aug 11, 2014 #8

    Ryan_m_b

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    Will do! Thanks.
     
  10. Aug 11, 2014 #9

    Ryan_m_b

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    Valve springs seem to have come up trumps, found http://dairally.net/daihard/chas/MiscCalculators/DaiValveSpring.htm [Broken] that has lots of information and calculators. Seems enough to satisfy my curiosity for now.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  11. Aug 11, 2014 #10

    berkeman

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    Are trumps good or bad?
     
  12. Aug 11, 2014 #11

    Ryan_m_b

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    Lol sorry, to come up trumps is to be successful/provide a solution :smile:
     
  13. Aug 11, 2014 #12

    AlephZero

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    Another example would be the gas spring in your office chair (assuming you have an office). The energy stored = mgh where m is your mass and h is the distance it is compressed.
     
  14. Aug 12, 2014 #13

    Lok

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    A mechanical watch.
     
  15. Aug 12, 2014 #14

    Lok

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  16. Feb 3, 2017 #15

    Baluncore

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    Fundamentally, energy is stored in the elastic material. Look at a stress – strain diagram, identify the extent of elastic deformation, before plastic deformation or failure. You then know the maximum energy storage possible for a particular mass of that material. The shape of the spring you make from that material will determine the particular spring constant.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooke's_law#General_application_to_elastic_materials
     
  17. Feb 3, 2017 #16

    CWatters

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    What size springs? This site allows you to specify the diameter, relaxed length and spring constant (Rate). I put some numbers in and it came up with 17,000 to choose from and they were just the compression springs. They also do extension, torsion and conical springs.

    https://www.thespringstore.com/tech-info/off-the-shelf-springs.html?category_id=3#

    It doesn't give you the energy storage but that can be easily calculated from the rate (k) and the suggested maximum deflection (x).

    E = 0.5kx2
     
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