Energy storage density of coiled springs

In summary, the conversation discusses the energy storage density of coiled springs made of various materials, including steel, titanium, carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes. The speakers note that a spring with a large deflection and high yield strength would be ideal for energy storage, making titanium a potential candidate. Carbon fiber may also be suitable due to its light weight, but its stiffness may limit its deflection. The possibility of using a simpler spring, such as a leaf spring, is also mentioned. The idea of using quartz as a spring material is also brought up, with its advantage of no memory or hysteresis.
  • #1
stanleykorn
2
0
I’m looking for an information source on the energy storage density of coiled springs made of various materials. Of particular interest are steel, titanium, carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.
 
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  • #2
stanleykorn said:
I’m looking for an information source on the energy storage density of coiled springs made of various materials. Of particular interest are steel, titanium, carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

The stored energy in a spring is 1/2*K*x^2, so from an energy storage standpoint it would be best to have a spring that had a large deflection (high yield strength). This brings Titanium into the picture due to its very large yield point. It's possible carbon fiber would be pretty good from a weight ratio standpoint because it's so light, but it is also very stiff which means it wouldn't deflect very far before breaking (keep in mind the x^2 in the energy formula).

You'll basically have to do some calculation of a theoretical spring of certain dimensions made out of a specific material. You might consider analyzing a simpler spring like a leaf spring since a load will be taken in pue tension/compression in the beam, where as a coil spring tends to have a combination of bending and torsional sresses. It probably isn't useful to discuss a carbon nanotube spring, since they don't exist (and carbo nanotubes are best in tension, like carbon fiber).
 
  • #3
Quartz can be made into some very good springs. the advantage over metals, no memory (or hysteresis) even over years of space travel.

dr
 

Related to Energy storage density of coiled springs

1. What is energy storage density?

Energy storage density is the amount of energy that can be stored in a given amount of space or mass. It is typically measured in joules per cubic meter (J/m3) or joules per kilogram (J/kg).

2. How is energy storage density of coiled springs calculated?

The energy storage density of coiled springs is calculated by dividing the maximum energy stored in the spring by its volume or mass. This can be determined using the spring constant, which is a measure of the stiffness of the spring, and the maximum displacement of the spring.

3. What factors affect the energy storage density of coiled springs?

The energy storage density of coiled springs is affected by several factors, including the material used to make the spring, the size and shape of the spring, and the number of coils in the spring. Generally, materials with higher strength and stiffness, such as steel, will have a higher energy storage density.

4. How does the energy storage density of coiled springs compare to other energy storage methods?

Coiled springs have a relatively high energy storage density compared to other mechanical energy storage methods, such as flywheels and compressed air. However, they have a lower energy storage density compared to chemical energy storage methods, such as batteries or fuel cells.

5. What are some practical applications of coiled springs for energy storage?

Coiled springs have a wide range of practical applications for energy storage, including in mechanical devices such as watches and toys, as well as in larger systems such as shock absorbers in vehicles and in renewable energy technologies like wind turbines. They can also be used in combination with other energy storage methods to improve overall energy storage efficiency.

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