Repelling Non-Magnetized Metal

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In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using magnets or electromagnets to repel from a metal. The idea is to quickly flip the magnet or reverse the polarity faster than the metal can realign, creating a repulsive force. However, this logic is faulty as the metal may not be attracted to magnets in the first place and the suggested mechanism is not a common magnetic levitation method. The conversation also mentions the concept of Lenz's Law and induced currents as a potential explanation for magnetic repulsion.
  • #1
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So I've just been thinking about how one could possible use Magnets/Electromagnets to repel from a metal.

I came up with the following thought:

Metal is attracted to a magnet because the magnet aligns the electrons in the metal to the opposite of the magnet (ie. a N pole put to a metal will charge the side facing the magnet to be S).

If the metal keeps the charge somewhat after removing the magnet, could you not quickly flip the magnet so that the charge in the metal is now the same as the charge of the magnet?

Of course it would quickly realign the metal to attract, but for an instant wouldn't it repel with like charges?

If that's true, couldn't you repel a metal by quickly reversing the polarity of the magnet faster than the magnetic field of the metal can realign? As the charge began to realign, the magnet would stop repelling, but before it could fall, the pole would be flipped.

Is my logic faulty, or would this just be too impractical to time perfectly? Or is there an easier way to repel a metal without having to align the charge beforehand (the final idea would be to create a frictionless buffer around a metal flagpole).

Thanks!
 
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  • #2
BigCheese said:
So I've just been thinking about how one could possible use Magnets/Electromagnets to repel from a metal.

I came up with the following thought:

Metal is attracted to a magnet because the magnet aligns the electrons in the metal to the opposite of the magnet (ie. a N pole put to a metal will charge the side facing the magnet to be S).

If the metal keeps the charge somewhat after removing the magnet, could you not quickly flip the magnet so that the charge in the metal is now the same as the charge of the magnet?

Of course it would quickly realign the metal to attract, but for an instant wouldn't it repel with like charges?

If that's true, couldn't you repel a metal by quickly reversing the polarity of the magnet faster than the magnetic field of the metal can realign? As the charge began to realign, the magnet would stop repelling, but before it could fall, the pole would be flipped.

Is my logic faulty, or would this just be too impractical to time perfectly? Or is there an easier way to repel a metal without having to align the charge beforehand (the final idea would be to create a frictionless buffer around a metal flagpole).

Thanks!

Your logic is faulty. If this is true, then ALL metal will be attracted to magnets. Would you like to check if this is true?

Zz.
 
  • #3
I'm assuming the metal to be Steel, not a non-magnetic material.

I'm not quite sure which part of my logic is faulty. If the electrons aren't realigned when in a magnetic field, why exactly then is steel attract to a magnet? If they are realigned, why doesn't it provide a small field of itself?
 
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  • #4
BigCheese said:
... couldn't you repel a metal by quickly reversing the polarity of the magnet faster than the magnetic field of the metal can realign?...

Hmmm. I find that to be an interesting comment; worthy of a least some consideration.
Perhaps it's not possible at all, I don't know, but I sense a theoretical plausibility given that electron realignment is much slower than magnetic field propagation.
Just not sure about this. Interesting concept, though.
 
  • #5
BigCheese said:
I'm assuming the metal to be Steel, not a non-magnetic material.

I'm not quite sure which part of my logic is faulty. If the electrons aren't realigned when in a magnetic field, why exactly then is steel attract to metal? If they are realigned, why doesn't it provide a small field of itself?

The material doesn't have to be steel, but your mechanism isn't one of the common magnetic levitation mechanisms. You're closest to levitation via Lenz' Law:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_levitation
wikipedia.org said:
Induced currents

Main article: electrodynamic suspension

These schemes work due to repulsion due to Lenz's law. When a conductor is presented with a time-varying magnetic field electrical currents in the conductor are set up which create a magnetic field that causes a repulsive effect.
 

What is repelling non-magnetized metal?

Repelling non-magnetized metal is the phenomenon where two non-magnetic metal objects are able to push away from each other without any external magnets or magnetic fields present.

How does repelling non-magnetized metal work?

This phenomenon is caused by the presence of opposite electric charges on the surface of the metal objects. When the two objects come close to each other, these electric charges repel each other, causing the objects to push away from each other.

What types of metal can be repelled?

Any non-magnetic metal can be repelled, as long as it has electric charges present on its surface. This includes metals such as aluminum, copper, and brass.

Can repelling non-magnetized metal be used for practical applications?

Yes, this phenomenon has been studied and applied in various industries, such as in the production of microchips and electronic devices. It has also been used in levitation technology and in creating frictionless bearings.

What factors can affect the strength of repelling non-magnetized metal?

The strength of repelling non-magnetized metal can be affected by the distance between the objects, the surface area of the objects, and the number and distribution of electric charges on the surface of the objects.

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