Resonance frequency of guitar string

In summary, the guitar string has two resonance frequencies at 1260 Hz and 1575 Hz with no frequencies in between. The fundamental frequency, which is the lowest resonant frequency, can be calculated by finding the ratio of the two given frequencies and expressing it as a fraction. This will give a hint as to what the fundamental frequency might be.
  • #1
mikefitz
155
0
A guitar string resonates at 1260 Hz and 1575 Hz with no resonance frequencies in between. Find its fundamental(the lowest) resonance frequency.




I know that fundamental frequency is the number of times it completes in one second, measured in hertz. In this specific problem, should I be taking the average of the two given values to calculate the fundamental resonance frequency?
 
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  • #2
mikefitz said:
A guitar string resonates at 1260 Hz and 1575 Hz with no resonance frequencies in between. Find its fundamental(the lowest) resonance frequency.

I know that fundamental frequency is the number of times it completes in one second, measured in hertz. In this specific problem, should I be taking the average of the two given values to calculate the fundamental resonance frequency?

No. The resonant frequencies of a string are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. The fundamental frequency is somewhere below both of the frequencies listed.
 
  • #3
OlderDan said:
No. The resonant frequencies of a string are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. The fundamental frequency is somewhere below both of the frequencies listed.

I recall you saying that a few weeks ago when I had a similar problem. My trouble is I do not know how to calculate the fundamental frequency - I know it's an integer, I'm also assuming I don't just pick some arbitrary integer multiple and say that is the fundamental frequency...
 
  • #4
You know that the fundamental frequency, multiplied by some number, equals 1260. If the next resonance is at 1575, then you will multiply the resonance by one plus the first number to get 1575.
 
  • #5
mikefitz said:
I recall you saying that a few weeks ago when I had a similar problem. My trouble is I do not know how to calculate the fundamental frequency - I know it's an integer, I'm also assuming I don't just pick some arbitrary integer multiple and say that is the fundamental frequency...

Calculate the ratio of the frequencies you are given and express that as a fraction. That should give you a hint what the fundamental frequency might be.
 

Related to Resonance frequency of guitar string

1. What is the resonance frequency of a guitar string?

The resonance frequency of a guitar string is the specific pitch that the string produces when it vibrates at its natural frequency. This frequency is determined by the length, thickness, tension, and material of the string.

2. How is the resonance frequency of a guitar string measured?

The resonance frequency of a guitar string can be measured using a tuner or a frequency counter. These devices detect the vibrations of the string and display the corresponding frequency.

3. How does the resonance frequency of a guitar string affect its sound?

The resonance frequency of a guitar string is directly related to the pitch of the sound it produces. A string with a higher resonance frequency will produce a higher pitch, while a string with a lower resonance frequency will produce a lower pitch.

4. Can the resonance frequency of a guitar string be changed?

Yes, the resonance frequency of a guitar string can be changed by altering the length, thickness, tension, or material of the string. This is how guitarists are able to tune their strings to different pitches.

5. Why is understanding the resonance frequency of a guitar string important?

Understanding the resonance frequency of a guitar string is important for musicians and instrument makers because it allows them to create and tune instruments with specific pitches and tones. It also helps in troubleshooting and identifying issues with the sound of a guitar.

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