Searching for Classical Mechanics book

  • Thread starter Xian
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  • #1
Xian
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So everyone here already knows how important understanding classical mechanics is so that brings me to my question; What is a good introductory mechanics book that has nice complete mathematical derivations, good well-written physics explanation, and large breadth in terms of subject matter. In other words, what's the best Classical Mechanics book out there?

Thanks in advance guys = )
 

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  • #2
dx
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What level are you looking for? "An Introduction to Mechanics" by Kleppner and Kolenkow is the best introductory book I've seen.
 
  • #3
gmax137
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wow I used Kleppner & Kolenkow in freshman physics a long time ago (mid 1970s). It was good then and I guess it still is. The more 'advanced' classical mechanics texts (say Goldstein) quickly gets more mathematical, not too surprising since I think the study of mechanics drove the advancement of a lot of math.
 
  • #4
Cantab Morgan
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I have to echo the Kleppner and Kolenkow recommendation. Since you never forget your first love, for me this is the mechanics book. I'm a bit on the fence about how suitable this book is for self study, but it's truly excellent as a classroom text.

If you're interested in Lagrangian mechanics too, David Morin's Introduction to Classical Mechanics with problems and solutions covers this topic very well, still at an introductory level. A key strength of this book is a nearly unlimited supply of solved mechanics problems.

Having said that, every physics student's library should also include the Feynman Lectures, and the Landau and Lifgarbagez Mechanics book.
 
  • #5
orthovector
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Is there a solutions manual to kleppner and kolenkow book?
 
  • #6
Cantab Morgan
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Is there a solutions manual to kleppner and kolenkow book?

Yes. Many. Unfortunately, every one of us writes our own. :smile:

Be especially wary of the one with the trash can suspended by a column of water. The problem statement confuses kilograms and Newtons.
 
  • #7
xristy
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David Morin's "Introduction to Classical Mechanics" (Cambridge, 2004) is chock full of excellect derivations and many many problems with solutions.
 

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