Sensitivity to CRT Televisions ?

  1. I've got a question about CRTs... Is it normal for them to emit this low wining/ringing sound even after start up? It's annoying and headache inducing.

    My old TV became really bad with this, it was as if it was crying for blood ha, so I got a new one (also a CRT) and the same problem popped up again... except it's much lower. It can be tolerated but after I shut off the TV this pressure on the back of my head goes off and that sound stops. Every time that happens I'm reminded of this.

    I just requested for an exchange because maybe there's something wrong with this unit but I'm not really sure. When I was at the store, I went to the CRT section and sure enough I got that slight headache/pressure and that low ringing sound again.

    I did check the same TV model though and it didn't have a vibration sound inside when you're listening really close (like several inches to the side)... something the tv I have now exhibits so I'm thinking the new unit that'll exchange this could have something better than the current one.


    Still, I'm confused... am I just hyper sensitive? BTW, over the last few weeks I've had these insane headaches and the ringing sound without a TV... and they were EXACTLY like the ones I have now due to a CRT. They also got really bad when I turned on my old TV with the same sounds (but worse)... These are tapering off now and rarely happen but it's weird that they’re the same as the CRT noise and I’m wondering if it's just me or what. =\

    I remember months ago I didn't have any problem with CRTs so I have no idea what happened here. :confused:

    Thanks to whoever actually read this post; it's long but I needed to vent. There's no way I'm going with an LCD as it'll butcher every non-HD videogame out there and most of my gaming is on standard resolution games right now. This sucks. :frown:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Chi Meson

    Chi Meson 1,772
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Maybe it's the gaming that's giving you a headache? I dunno. It seems you have a unique problem. CRT's give off a high-pitch whine as a rule. No way to avoid that. But I don't know what you are hearing if it is "low pitch." Do other people's TV's do this to you?
     
  4. cronxeh

    cronxeh 1,232
    Gold Member

    I always "hear" the TV's emission sound even though there is no picture. I asked other adults around and most of them dont hear that tv is actually ON, but I've always been able to hear tv/monitors when they are on
     
  5. The flyback transformer in a CRT makes a high-pitched whine that is on the edge of the range of human hearing. Typically, what you'll find is that many younger people can hear it, but many grown adults cannot.
     
  6. siddharth

    siddharth 1,197
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    That's exactly what happens to me as well. I'm surprised how other adults aren't able to hear it, but me and my sister can hear it clearly.
     
  7. Are there different degrees to this whine? Because my old TV as it was dying scared the hell out of me and was so painful I couldn't stand a minute of it, it was like someone was stabbing my head, but this one is just ok thought a bit annoying.


    To the people that also hear this:

    do you also get headaches? For me turning off the TV simultaneously turns off some "pressure" on the back of my head, or headaches, and the sound goes away. Maybe there's something wrong with me that's exaggerating things. I mean I never heard it when I had a CRT monitor for my PC. When I think about it I think I probably was able to hear it before but it's the headaches that are new.
     

  8. It shouldn't be that surprising. Its purely an issue of hearing loss. I can hear it some old TVs just barely, but my CRT in front of is inaudible to me. Too much loud music I guess.
     
  9. I can definitely hear the screen. Seems like if you go to a channel that you don't pay for, and get colored static, then its louder. The changing picture or something..
     
  10. The high pitched noise is the sound of the horizontal refresh at about 16khz. When you have a corrupted video signal, there ends up being lower frequencies on top of the refresh. Put them together, and you have your louder noise. As people get older, most of the hearing loss is in that upper frequency range. I think that the use it or lose it rule applies, too. Most people don't pay any attention to subtle sounds over 4khz. Maybe that is why many older adults can't hear their TVs? This makes me wonder if the hearing loss could be tied to phone use. Phones' frequency response is capped at 4khz. Would people who use phones all the time be more likely to lose their hearing?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2006
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Similar discussions for: Sensitivity to CRT Televisions ?
Loading...