*Simple frequency and period question - Thanks

In summary, the conversation is about a physics problem involving a glider attached to a spring. The question is divided into two parts, A and B. The person is having trouble starting with question A and is asking for help. They have some equations in their notes but are not sure how to apply them to find the answer for A. They also attempt to solve for the period of the glider's motion and the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion, but are unsure if their answers are correct. They are looking for guidance to get started on the problem.
  • #1
nukeman
655
0

Homework Statement



Ok, below is the question. I am having trouble with getting started. Like the first steps. A and B are the questions I am having trouble with.

"A 1.00 kg glider attached to a spring with a force constant of 25.0 N/m oscillates on a frictionless, horizontal air track. At t = 0, the glider is passing through its equilibrium position with a velocity vx = - 0.150 m/s. (The negative sign means that the glider is headed in the direction which will compress the spring.)

(a) Calculate the frequency and period of the glider’s motion.

(b) Calculate the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion. "

Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution



I just don't know how to get start with question A)

EDIT: This is from my notes

Frequency = 1/T
Where T = Period
Or Period = 1/f
Where f is Frequency

But I am not sure how to get the answer to A) for this question from that above data. ?

is this correct for period?

2*pi*sqrt( 1/25) = 1.25

so frequency would be 1 / 1.25 = .8?NOW, is this correct for B) amplitude:

KE = PE, so answer I got was when solving for x was: .03
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
You should have a formula for the period of a mass on a spring somewhere in your notes.
 
  • #3
For time you may use time period of SHM
viz [itex]T = 2\pi \Large{\sqrt{\frac{m}{k}}}[/itex]

EDIT:

To find this, consider eqn for x coordinate of SHM, [itex]x=Asin(\omega t + \delta)[/itex]

This x repeats itself when sin repeats, ie, after 2π or time period T

[itex]sin(\omega t + \delta + 2\pi) = sin(\omega (t+T) + \delta)[/itex]

[itex](\omega t + \delta + 2\pi) = (\omega (t+T) + \delta)[/itex]

[itex]T = \Large{\frac{2\pi}{\omega}}[/itex] and in starting of this derivation we assume [itex]\omega = \Large{ \sqrt{\frac{k}{m}} }[/itex]
 
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  • #4
I am very lost on this. Is anything I did correct?

Any help would be fantastic to get me started. Thanks!
 
  • #5
I can provide some guidance on how to approach this problem. First, let's review the equations you have provided from your notes:

Frequency = 1/T

Period = 1/f

Where:

T = period

f = frequency

Now, let's apply these equations to the problem at hand. For question A, we are asked to calculate the frequency and period of the glider's motion. To do this, we need to use the given information about the glider's mass (1.00 kg) and the force constant of the spring (25.0 N/m). We also need to remember that the glider is undergoing simple harmonic motion, which means it is oscillating back and forth with a constant frequency. This frequency is determined by the mass of the glider and the spring constant.

To calculate the frequency, we can use the equation f = 1/2π * √(k/m), where k is the spring constant and m is the mass of the glider. Plugging in the values given in the problem, we get:

f = 1/2π * √(25.0 N/m / 1.00 kg) = 1.26 Hz

Therefore, the frequency of the glider's motion is 1.26 Hz.

To calculate the period, we can use the equation T = 1/f, where T is the period and f is the frequency. Plugging in the frequency we just calculated, we get:

T = 1/1.26 Hz = 0.79 seconds

Therefore, the period of the glider's motion is 0.79 seconds.

Now, for question B, we are asked to calculate the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion. Amplitude is defined as the maximum displacement of the glider from its equilibrium position. In other words, it is the distance between the glider's equilibrium position and its maximum displacement.

To calculate the amplitude, we can use the equation A = x_max, where A is the amplitude and x_max is the maximum displacement. In order to find x_max, we need to use the given information about the glider's initial velocity (vx = -0.150 m/s) and its equilibrium position. We also need to remember that the glider is undergoing simple harmonic motion, which means it is oscillating symmetrically around its equilibrium position. This means that the maximum displacement is equal to the initial
 

Related to *Simple frequency and period question - Thanks

1. What is frequency?

Frequency is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time. It is typically measured in Hertz (Hz). For example, if a sound wave repeats itself 100 times in 1 second, the frequency would be 100 Hz.

2. How is frequency related to wavelength?

Frequency and wavelength are inversely proportional. This means that as frequency increases, wavelength decreases, and vice versa. This relationship is described by the equation: frequency = speed of light / wavelength.

3. What is the period of a wave?

The period of a wave is the amount of time it takes for one complete cycle or oscillation to occur. It is the inverse of frequency, meaning that a higher frequency wave will have a shorter period and vice versa. The unit of period is typically seconds (s).

4. How do you calculate frequency from period?

The formula for calculating frequency from period is: frequency = 1 / period. So, if the period is given in seconds, the frequency will be in Hertz (Hz).

5. What are some common examples of waves with different frequencies?

Some common examples of waves with different frequencies include radio waves, which have a frequency range of 3 Hz to 300 GHz, visible light waves, which have a frequency range of 430 THz to 750 THz, and gamma rays, which have a frequency range of 10^19 Hz to 10^24 Hz.

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