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Simple harmonic motion acceleration

  1. Nov 3, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    10630a3ad979be4a0d95323fe944ac7c.png

    2. Relevant equations
    acceleration = -(2*pi*f)^2 * x, where f is the frequency and x is the displacement from equilibrium.

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I thought the acceleration would be greatest when the displacement from equilibrium is greatest, so at point P, but the answer is at point R and I'm not sure why.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 3, 2014 #2

    BvU

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    Re relevant equation: since there is damping, the expression for the acceleration is a little different: generally the damping force is taken to be proportional to the speed, so there is a term in the force ##-\beta v## and we write $$ m a + \beta v + k x = 0 $$ so that $$a = -{\beta \over m} v - {k\over m} x$$

    Re where magnitude of a is maximum: I agree with you. Both at P and R |v| = 0 and |x| is bigger at P.
     
  4. Nov 3, 2014 #3
    I'm fairly sure the answers I have been given for this question are wrong then, as I'm also getting weird results for later parts, thanks.
     
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