Simple harmonic motion questions

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of a u-tube manometer filled with water and its resulting pressure and force calculations. It also mentions the use of conservation of energy to determine the extension of a bungee jumper's rope and the resulting tension at rest.
  • #1
blackcat
60
0
A u-tube manometer is half filled with water. The liquid levels are displaced so that one side is higher than the other. The water is then left free to oscillate from side to side. The tube has a cross sectional area of 1.cm^2 and the inital displacement is 0.1m from the rest position, which is 0.5m above the middle of the bottom of the tube.

The total length of tube filled with water is 1.1m.

g = 10 N/kg

1) Using the relationship of pressure and density and depth, calculate the pressure at the bottom of the tube due to each of the unbalanced columns of water and hence the resultatn force acting..

Please someone explain/help.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
the answers are meant to be "4000Pa, 6000Pa, 0.2N"
 
  • #3
Never Mind I Got It..
 
  • #4
Well I got the pressures. How can I work out the force?
 
  • #5
don't you just use p = F/area?
 
  • #6
yeah that's it thanks.

also:

a bungee jumper jumps from a high platform. he has a mass of 60kg and the rope, which is tied to the platform is light, 20m long and perfectly elastic with a stiness of 30 N/m.

g = 10N/kg

How far will the bungee have stretched when the jumper first comes to rest?
 
  • #7
HINT: Conservation of energy.
 
  • #8
thanks i will have a look
 
  • #9
thanks for the help.

how do I find out the tension in the bungee when he's at rest? i'd have thought it's T = mg = 600N, but the answer says it's 1600N.
 
  • #10
blackcat said:
thanks for the help.

how do I find out the tension in the bungee when he's at rest? i'd have thought it's T = mg = 600N, but the answer says it's 1600N.
No problem. What is the extension in the bungee at this point (lowest point)?
 

1. What is simple harmonic motion (SHM)?

Simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion in which an object moves back and forth in a straight line about a central equilibrium point. The motion is caused by a restoring force that is directly proportional to the displacement of the object from the equilibrium point, and the motion is characterized by a constant amplitude and frequency.

2. What are the factors that determine the period of SHM?

The period of SHM is determined by two factors: the mass of the object and the stiffness of the spring. A heavier object or a stiffer spring will result in a longer period, while a lighter object or a less stiff spring will result in a shorter period.

3. How is SHM different from other types of periodic motion?

SHM is different from other types of periodic motion in that it is caused by a restoring force that is directly proportional to the displacement of the object, whereas other types of periodic motion may have different types of restoring forces, such as gravity or friction.

4. What is the relationship between SHM and simple pendulum motion?

The motion of a simple pendulum is a type of SHM, as it follows the same principles of a restoring force that is directly proportional to the displacement of the object from the equilibrium point. However, the motion of a simple pendulum is only applicable to objects with a small amplitude of motion.

5. How is SHM used in real-world applications?

SHM has many real-world applications, such as in musical instruments, where the vibration of strings or air columns produces sound. It is also used in clocks and watches to regulate the movement of the hands, and in shock absorbers to dampen oscillations in vehicles. SHM is also used in seismology to study earthquakes and in engineering to design structures that can withstand vibrations.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
607
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
21
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
Back
Top