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Simple Proof of Weierstass Approximation Theorem?

  • #1

Homework Statement


Let D={x in the set of real numbers: -3<x<3, x does not equal 0,1,2} and define g(x)=(cosx-1)/x + (x3-2x2-x+2)/(x2-3x+2) on D. Find G:R→R such that G is continuous everywhere and G(x)=g(x) when x is in set D.


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



From a past homework problem I know how to prove that, for any continuous f:R→R, there exists a sequence (pn) of polynomials such that pn converges uniformly to f on any given bounded subset of R.
So after I show that g(x) is continuous and that a sequence of polynomials that converges uniformly to g exists, how do I actually find the function G(x)?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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0
Use the definition of continuity: g(0) = lim(x->0) g(x) = 1 etc. (The limits of the form 0/0 are to be tackled with L'Hospital's rule).
You might want to have a look at Riemann's theorem on removable singularities to see how this is done in general.
P.S. - Where is the Weirstrass Approximation Thm. called for?
 

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