Solving a Physics Quiz: Calculate the Temperature Rise

In summary, to calculate the temperature rise using physics, you will need to use the specific heat capacity of the material, its mass, and the energy input. The specific heat capacity is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius and it is used in the formula for calculating temperature rise. However, this formula cannot be used for all materials as each material has a different specific heat capacity. If you do not have the specific heat capacity, you can use the heat transfer equation which takes into account the mass of the material, its initial temperature, and the amount of heat transfer. This formula can be used for any type of energy input as long as you have the necessary values.
  • #1
Sheldinoh
25
0
My Physics teacher gave us a quiz problem and I don't understand it really how he got his answer. Can you please give me your answer and an explanation for the answer Thanks. Here is the question:

A .5 kg rock is dropped from a height of 20 meters into a pail containing .6 kg of water. The rock has a specific heat of 1480 and the water has a specific heat of 4186. What is the is the rise in temperature of the rock and water ?
 
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  • #2
What do you think happened when the rock dropped??
 
  • #3


Sure, I'd be happy to help you with this problem. To solve for the temperature rise, we first need to understand the concept of specific heat. Specific heat is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by 1 degree Celsius.

In this problem, we have two substances - the rock and the water - with different specific heats. This means that they will require different amounts of heat energy to raise their temperatures by the same amount.

To solve for the temperature rise, we can use the formula Q = m x c x ΔT, where Q is the heat energy, m is the mass of the substance, c is the specific heat, and ΔT is the change in temperature.

First, let's calculate the heat energy for the rock. We know that the mass of the rock is .5 kg and the specific heat is 1480. We also know that the change in temperature is the same for both the rock and the water, so we can use the same value for ΔT. Plugging these values into the formula, we get:

Q = (.5 kg) x (1480 J/kg°C) x ΔT

Next, let's calculate the heat energy for the water. We know that the mass of the water is .6 kg and the specific heat is 4186. Again, we can use the same value for ΔT. Plugging these values into the formula, we get:

Q = (.6 kg) x (4186 J/kg°C) x ΔT

Since both substances experience the same change in temperature, we can set these two equations equal to each other:

(.5 kg) x (1480 J/kg°C) x ΔT = (.6 kg) x (4186 J/kg°C) x ΔT

We can then solve for ΔT by dividing both sides by the mass and specific heat terms:

ΔT = (.6 kg) x (4186 J/kg°C) / (.5 kg) x (1480 J/kg°C)

ΔT = 2.52°C

Therefore, the temperature rise for both the rock and the water is 2.52°C. I hope this helps to clarify the problem for you. Let me know if you have any further questions.
 

Related to Solving a Physics Quiz: Calculate the Temperature Rise

1. How do I calculate the temperature rise using physics?

To calculate the temperature rise, you need to use the specific heat capacity of the material, the mass of the material, and the energy input. The formula is: Temperature Rise = Energy Input / (Mass * Specific Heat Capacity).

2. What is specific heat capacity and how is it used to calculate temperature rise?

Specific heat capacity is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of a substance by 1 degree Celsius. It is used in the formula for calculating temperature rise because it represents the amount of energy needed to increase the temperature of a material.

3. Can I use the same formula to calculate temperature rise for different materials?

No, the specific heat capacity for each material is different, so you will need to use the specific heat capacity value for the specific material you are working with in the formula to calculate temperature rise.

4. Is there a way to estimate the temperature rise without using the specific heat capacity?

Yes, you can use the heat transfer equation, which takes into account the mass of the material, its initial temperature, and the amount of heat transfer. The formula is: Temperature Rise = Heat Transfer / (Mass * Change in Temperature).

5. Can I use this formula to calculate temperature rise for any type of energy input?

Yes, the formula for calculating temperature rise can be used for any type of energy input, such as electrical energy, mechanical energy, or chemical energy. As long as you have the necessary values for mass, specific heat capacity, and energy input, you can calculate the temperature rise for any type of energy input.

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