Solving for Mass M1 in Physics Problem Involving Pulley

In summary, the problem involves finding the mass M1 in a system where M2 is accelerating downwards at 2.43m/s2, theta is 15.0o, and muk is 0.560. The key equations involved are the sum of forces in the y direction for M2 and the sums for M1 in both x and y directions. By relating these equations, the value of M1 can be determined.
  • #1
lanzjohn
14
0

Homework Statement


M1 and M2 are two masses connected as shown. The pulley is light and frictionless. Find the mass M1, given that M2 (7.00kg) accelerates downwards at 2.43m/s2, that the angle theta is 15.0o, and that muk is 0.560.

prob75_fricpullplane.gif


Homework Equations



(Read below)

The Attempt at a Solution



I was sick the day we went over this and the notes I got do not tell me very much. That is why I have no attempts at this problem. Basically what I need is some guidance on where to start and how to find the equation needed for this problem. I am lost with where to start.

Thank you all for your help,
John
 
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  • #2
What is the sum of the forces in the y direction for M2? What are the sums (in x and y) for M1? Can you relate those equations together?
 

Related to Solving for Mass M1 in Physics Problem Involving Pulley

1. What is the formula for solving for mass M1 in a physics problem involving a pulley?

The formula for solving for mass M1 in a physics problem involving a pulley is M1 = (m2g - T)/a, where m2 is the mass of the object on the other end of the pulley, g is the acceleration due to gravity, T is the tension in the rope, and a is the acceleration of the system.

2. How do I determine the value of tension (T) in the formula?

The value of tension (T) can be determined by using Newton's second law, which states that the net force on an object is equal to its mass multiplied by its acceleration (F=ma). In the case of a pulley system, the tension in the rope is equal to the force pulling down on one side of the rope, which is equal to the weight of the object on the other side of the pulley (T = m2g).

3. Can I use this formula for any type of pulley system?

Yes, this formula can be used for any type of pulley system as long as the system is in equilibrium (not accelerating) and the mass of the pulley itself is negligible. This formula is commonly used in problems involving Atwood's machine, a simple pulley system with two masses on either side of the pulley.

4. What is the significance of mass M1 in this formula?

Mass M1 represents the unknown mass that is being solved for in the problem. It is typically the mass of the object on the same side of the pulley as the force being applied.

5. Are there any other variables that need to be considered in this formula?

Yes, there are other variables that may need to be considered depending on the specific problem. These include the coefficient of friction between the pulley and the rope, the angle of the rope, and any additional forces acting on the system. It is important to carefully read and understand the given problem before using this formula to ensure all relevant variables are accounted for.

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