Space-Time Curvature: A New Perspective on Dark Matter?

In summary, the conversation discusses the idea that space-time curvature may not be caused by matter, but rather be an inherent characteristic of space-time. This could potentially explain dark matter, but there is a need for valid justification for this concept. The conversation also mentions the role of a non-zero cosmological constant in the curvature of space-time.
  • #1
Grieverheart
31
0
Could it be possible that space-time curvature is not caused by matter but is an inherent characteristic of space-time? Wouldn't this explain dark matter?
 
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  • #2
If there is a non-zero cosmological constant, then spacetime is inherently curved in the sense that flat Minkowski spacetime is not possible. This could be dark energy, not dark matter.
 
  • #3
Yes but a cosmological constant in a sense gives a global curvature not a local one.
 
  • #4
Grieverheart said:
Yes but a cosmological constant in a sense gives a global curvature not a local one.

Yes, I interpreted "inherently curved" to mean everywhere and at all times. Now I don't know what you have in mind. Spacetime curvature that can vary arbitrarily?
 
  • #5
Yes, my thought is that maybe matter is not what curves space-time (i.e. it is not matter that attracts matter) but a curvature already existed in place beforehand.
 
  • #6
Grieverheart said:
Yes, my thought is that maybe matter is not what curves space-time (i.e. it is not matter that attracts matter) but a curvature already existed in place beforehand.

Then you need some valid justification (as in peer-reviewed sources) for that or else this thread is considered as speculative. Please review the https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=414380" on our policy of such a discussion.

Zz.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
Yes, sorry for posting on the wrong forum and thanks for pointing that out. I guess I'll wait for the thread to get delete or moved then :S .
 

Related to Space-Time Curvature: A New Perspective on Dark Matter?

1. What is space-time curvature?

Space-time curvature refers to the bending of space and time in the presence of massive objects such as planets, stars, and galaxies. This concept is a fundamental part of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

2. How does space-time curvature relate to dark matter?

The theory of dark matter suggests that there is a significant amount of matter in the universe that cannot be directly observed because it does not emit or interact with light. Space-time curvature can explain the effects of this invisible matter on the motion of visible objects, such as stars and galaxies, through its gravitational pull.

3. How does this new perspective on dark matter differ from previous theories?

Previous theories about dark matter proposed the existence of undiscovered particles that make up the invisible matter. This new perspective suggests that the effects attributed to dark matter can be explained by the bending of space-time in the presence of massive objects, without the need for new particles.

4. What evidence supports the idea of space-time curvature as an explanation for dark matter?

Observations of the rotation of galaxies, the distribution of matter in galaxy clusters, and the bending of light by massive objects all support the existence of dark matter. However, recent studies have shown that these phenomena can also be explained by space-time curvature without the need for dark matter particles.

5. How does this new perspective impact our understanding of the universe?

If space-time curvature is confirmed as the primary explanation for dark matter, it could revolutionize our understanding of the universe. It would mean that we do not need to rely on the existence of new particles to explain the behavior of objects in space, and it could lead to new insights into the nature of gravity and the structure of the universe.

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