Spectral lines in the emission spectrum for an electron at n= 3

In summary, the conversation discusses the possible paths of an excited electron in a simplified model of hydrogen and the number of lines that can be produced in an emission spectrum. It is noted that the assumption is that there is only one energy value for each value of n and that three lines can be produced corresponding to the initial state n = 3.
  • #1
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Homework Statement
Find the spectral lines of in the emission spectrum for an electron excited to 3rd Orbit.
Relevant Equations
One line belonging to n=3 to n =1or two lines belonging to n=3 to n =2 and then n=2 to =1.
Since there is only one excited electron, it could come from n=3 to n =1directly or n=3 to n =2 and then n=2 to =1.

Hence, there could be one or two lines depending upon the path taken by electron.
Is this right?
 
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  • #2
Yes. This assumes you're considering a simplified model of hydrogen, say, where effects due to electron spin are ignored. In particular, the assumption here is that there is only one energy value corresponding to a particular value of n.

Instead of saying there could be one or two lines depending upon the path taken by the electron, I think most people would say there are three lines that can be produced corresponding to the initial state n = 3. This is because emission spectra are usually generated by repeated transitions from many atoms. Some of these transitions are directly from ##3 \rightarrow 1## and some are the indirect ##3 \rightarrow 2 \rightarrow 1##. So, all three lines would occur in the spectrum. But you are thinking about it correctly.
 
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  • #3
Thank you.
 
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1. What are spectral lines in the emission spectrum for an electron at n= 3?

Spectral lines are specific wavelengths of light that are emitted when an electron in an atom transitions from a higher energy level (such as n=3) to a lower energy level.

2. Why is n=3 a significant energy level for spectral lines?

n=3 is significant because it is the first excited state for electrons in an atom. This means that when an electron transitions from n=3 to a lower energy level, it releases a specific amount of energy in the form of light, creating a unique spectral line.

3. How are spectral lines in the emission spectrum for an electron at n= 3 produced?

Spectral lines are produced when an electron in an atom absorbs energy, typically in the form of heat or light, and jumps to a higher energy level. When the electron returns to its original energy level, it releases the absorbed energy as light, creating a spectral line at a specific wavelength.

4. What is the significance of the different colors in the emission spectrum for an electron at n= 3?

The different colors in the emission spectrum correspond to different wavelengths of light, which are determined by the amount of energy released by the electron. The shorter the wavelength, the higher the energy and the bluer the color. The longer the wavelength, the lower the energy and the redder the color.

5. How are spectral lines in the emission spectrum for an electron at n= 3 used in scientific research?

Spectral lines are used in a variety of scientific fields, including astronomy, chemistry, and physics. By analyzing the specific wavelengths of light emitted by an atom, scientists can determine the elements present in a sample, study the energy levels of atoms, and gather information about the composition and properties of celestial objects.

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