Speed at 5 Seconds on Linear Plot with Slope 5.0 m/s2

In summary, the slope of 5.0 m/s2 on a linear plot represents the acceleration of an object and the rate at which its velocity changes in 1 second. To calculate the speed at 5 seconds, you would first find the corresponding point on the plot and use the slope formula. The speed at 5 seconds can be negative, indicating deceleration. A change in the slope would affect the speed at 5 seconds by changing the rate of velocity change. The speed at 5 seconds is not necessarily the same as the average speed over a 5-second interval, as it only represents the speed at that specific moment.
  • #1
fatmike6305
2
0
A linear plot of speed versus elapsed time has a slope of 5.0 m/s2 and a vertical intercept of 5.0 m/s.
(a) What is the change in speed in the time interval between 4.0 seconds and 6.0 seconds?
The answer is 10, which completely makes sense to me.
But...

(b) What is the speed when the elapsed time is equal to 5.0 seconds?
5.0 m/s2 after 5 seconds, i thought the speed would be 25 (speed starts at 0)? I'm not sure where the vertical intercept comes in.
 
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  • #2
What is speed at t = 0 ?
 
  • #3


I would like to clarify that the speed at 5 seconds would actually be 30 m/s, not 25 m/s. This is because the vertical intercept of 5.0 m/s is added to the slope of 5.0 m/s2 multiplied by the elapsed time of 5 seconds. The vertical intercept represents the initial speed at time zero, which in this case is 5.0 m/s. Therefore, the final speed at 5 seconds would be 5.0 m/s + (5.0 m/s2 * 5 seconds) = 30 m/s.

Additionally, the change in speed in the time interval between 4.0 seconds and 6.0 seconds would be 10 m/s. This is calculated by finding the difference in speed at these two times, which would be 35 m/s at 6.0 seconds and 25 m/s at 4.0 seconds. Therefore, the change in speed would be 35 m/s - 25 m/s = 10 m/s.

In summary, the vertical intercept on a linear plot of speed versus elapsed time represents the initial speed at time zero, and should be taken into consideration when finding the speed at a specific time. The slope of the plot represents the rate of change of speed over time, and can be used to calculate the change in speed over a given time interval.
 

Related to Speed at 5 Seconds on Linear Plot with Slope 5.0 m/s2

1. What does the slope of 5.0 m/s2 represent on a linear plot?

The slope of 5.0 m/s2 on a linear plot represents the acceleration of an object. In other words, it shows the rate at which the object's velocity changes in 1 second.

2. How is speed at 5 seconds calculated on a linear plot with a slope of 5.0 m/s2?

To calculate the speed at 5 seconds on a linear plot with a slope of 5.0 m/s2, you would first find the corresponding point on the plot at 5 seconds. Then, you would use the slope formula (speed = slope x time) to determine the speed at that point. In this case, the speed would be 25 m/s.

3. Can the speed at 5 seconds be negative on a linear plot with a slope of 5.0 m/s2?

Yes, the speed at 5 seconds can be negative on a linear plot with a slope of 5.0 m/s2. This would indicate that the object is decelerating, or slowing down, at 5 seconds.

4. How does a change in the slope affect the speed at 5 seconds on a linear plot?

A change in the slope would affect the speed at 5 seconds by changing the rate at which the object's velocity is changing. A steeper slope would result in a higher speed at 5 seconds, while a shallower slope would result in a lower speed at 5 seconds.

5. Is the speed at 5 seconds the same as the average speed over a 5-second interval?

No, the speed at 5 seconds is not necessarily the same as the average speed over a 5-second interval. The speed at 5 seconds only represents the speed at that specific moment, while the average speed over a 5-second interval takes into account the object's speed at various points within that time period.

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