Sports on Moon: Physics Projects for Future NASA Missions

In summary, Mr. Berkman didn't think his project was very good and he was insulted by the people on the homework forum. He also said that he tried to solve the problem in a number of ways but wasn't successful. He also said that he isn't the son of Mr. Hoot and that calling him that was inappropriate.
  • #1
Deftones
3
0
www.vanderbilt.edu/cso/SSI2003-Williamson/lessons/sportsonmoon/lesson.doc[/URL]

In my physical science class I am doing a project roughly like the one seen above. I have to apply physics concepts and formulas to design a sport on the moon. I was told in the future NASA will probably be using high-temperature superconducting discs for artificial gravity which makes this whole project seem really stupid to me . But anyway, anyone have any ideas or suggestions?
 
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  • #2
You guys suck.
 
  • #3
Deftones said:
You guys suck.

What is that in aid of?
 
  • #4
The gravity constant on the moon is approximately 1/6 that of Earth's, so you can use that if talking about trajectories.

What's the use in asking for help and then insulting us? Not very good etiquette when you're new to a community! :)
 
  • #5
Deftones said:
You guys suck.
One of the rules that you agreed to when you signed on to post in the homework forum, is that you will show your work and demonstrate that you have tried to solve the problem. The rest of us then try to give you hints or suggestions on ways that you can get farther along in solving your problem.

So a better way to have phrased your original post would have been to state the problem like you did, but then post your initial thoughts about what kinds of things should go into the report. For example, although humans have not lived on the moon for any period of time (as mentioned in the project document you posted), we *have* lived on space stations for extended periods of time. What kinds of athletic activities have been tried on space stations to help keep astronauts more fit? What were the problems and the results? Also, given the 1/6 gravity issue for the moon, what is the biggest problem with sports and athletics there? Hint -- it's very similar to the 0-gravity problem on the space stations.

If you spend a little effort in your PF posts, I think you'll find out that we don't suck at all. We rock, son.
 
  • #6
Okay cool, some replies. let's see...

First of all Mr. Berkman I have tried to solve the problem (me having a report) in several ways so far. I'm just at odds at how I'm supposed to demonstrate on a forum how I tried to bribe Mr. Kovax, threaten other kids into giving me their reports, and fake a traumatic breakdown. That would probably involve a video camera and another restraining order and I don't have time for that right now.

Also thanks for the advice, oh and by the way... I am not your son. Calling me your son was completely innapropriate... I already have a father and am quite happy with him so please, keep your sick perverted fantasies to yourself. On a final note, you so do not rock in the slightest.

Now as for "z-component" thanks for your incredible insight into the moon having app. 1/6 the acceleration due to gravity of the earth. Of course I had learned that in my physics class but to my dismay I was shortly thereafter bludgeoned in the head repeatedly by my lab assistant after telling her she was ugly as sin and should keep her PMS to herself. Idk what I would have done if you didn't remind me, except that it might involve opening my textbook to page 3.

"What is that in aid of?" -Mr. Hoot
Helping you acknowledge your suckiness....why do I waste my creativity on things like this?
 
  • #7
Well, the PF community at large is very successful and insightful. I have to agree with berkeman and declare that we, PF, do rock! I've never been more pleased with a website and if you give it time, you should agree. The range of discussion is wonderful and you can learn a lot here, no matter how much physics you know.
 
  • #8
If you spend a little effort in your PF posts, I think you'll find out that we don't suck at all. We rock, son.

right on:cool: .
 

Related to Sports on Moon: Physics Projects for Future NASA Missions

1. What are the potential benefits of studying sports on the moon?

Studying sports on the moon can provide valuable insights into the effects of low gravity on human movement and performance. This information can be used to develop exercise and rehabilitation programs for astronauts during long-term space missions. Additionally, it can also improve our understanding of how to design equipment and spacesuits for future lunar missions.

2. How does the low gravity on the moon affect sports performance?

The low gravity on the moon, which is about one-sixth of Earth's gravity, significantly alters the way humans move and perform physical activities. On the moon, athletes would experience reduced muscle and bone strength, changes in balance and coordination, and slower reaction times. This could impact the overall speed, accuracy, and power of sports performance on the lunar surface.

3. What are some potential challenges in conducting sports on the moon?

One of the main challenges in conducting sports on the moon is the lack of air resistance, which is essential for many sports on Earth. This would require the development of specialized equipment and techniques to compensate for the lack of air resistance. Additionally, the low gravity and different terrain on the moon may also present challenges in terms of adapting traditional sports to the lunar environment.

4. How can studying sports on the moon benefit future NASA missions?

Studying sports on the moon can provide valuable data and insights that can be applied to future NASA missions. This includes developing exercise programs for astronauts to maintain their physical health during long-term missions, designing equipment and spacesuits that are optimized for lunar conditions, and understanding how to mitigate the effects of low gravity on human performance in various tasks.

5. What are some potential future research directions for sports on the moon?

Some potential future research directions for sports on the moon could include studying the effects of different levels of gravity on sports performance, developing specialized training programs for athletes to adapt to lunar conditions, and exploring the potential for new sports and physical activities that are uniquely suited to the moon's environment. Additionally, research could also focus on the psychological and social aspects of sports on the moon and its impact on the overall well-being of astronauts during future lunar missions.

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