Standing broad jump on the moon

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In summary, the person on the moon is struggling with an exercise and is unsure of how to solve for the range, maximum height, and duration of a standing broad jump when given the average force generated during launching and the distance over which this force acts. They mention that they do not understand the meaning of F=2W and state that more information, such as the person's mass, is needed to solve the problem. They also mention the importance of considering potential energy on the moon, where the surface acceleration is about 1/6 of Earth's. Despite struggling with the exercise, the person thanks the summarizer for their help.
  • #1
nemesis08
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i am having trouble with this exercise, i don't understand much and the professor doesn't explain too well so I am kinda lost.



Consider a person on the moon who launches herself into a standing broad jump at 45 degrees. The average force generated during launching is, F = 2W and the distance over which this force acts is 60 cm. kindly compute:

a. The range of the jump
b. The maximum height of the jump
c. The duration of the jump
 
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  • #2
I'm not sure I understand what F=2W means. W could be watts but that's not a force that's a power unit. If you meant 2N as in Newtons then...

You still don't have enough information to solve the problem. You need the person's mass...consider if you push a 10 metric ton bus with a measly 2N over 60cm it is barely going to go anywhere but if you use a slingshot to do this with a small rock then you'll get a really long and high trajectory. Mass matters.

But assuming you have the mass then note that they give force and distance over which it acts. What quantity is force times distance? How does this relate to mass and velocity?

Also consider potential energy on the moon. Remember its surface acceleration is quite close to 1/6 Earth's 9.8 m/s^2.
 
  • #3
thanks tho, i don't know that's what the exersice say. That profesor is crazy and i really don't understand anything.


Lets see what i can do
 

1. How does the standing broad jump on the moon differ from Earth?

The standing broad jump on the moon differs from Earth due to the lower gravity on the moon. The gravity on the moon is approximately one-sixth of Earth's gravity, which means that objects and people on the moon weigh less and can jump higher and farther.

2. Can someone jump farther on the moon than on Earth?

Yes, due to the lower gravity on the moon, someone can jump farther on the moon compared to Earth. On Earth, the average person can jump about 1.5 meters, while on the moon, they can jump up to 9 meters.

3. Is the technique for a standing broad jump different on the moon?

Yes, the technique for a standing broad jump on the moon is different compared to Earth. Due to the lower gravity, one must use less force and more control to execute the jump. The arms also play a more significant role in generating momentum on the moon.

4. How does the surface of the moon affect the standing broad jump?

The surface of the moon does not have a significant impact on the standing broad jump. The moon's surface is solid, and the lower gravity does not affect the jump's takeoff or landing. However, the surface's texture and slope can play a role in the jump's distance and accuracy.

5. Can the standing broad jump on the moon be used to study gravity?

Yes, the standing broad jump on the moon can be used to study gravity. By understanding how gravity affects a person's jumping ability on the moon, scientists can gain a better understanding of the moon's gravity and its impact on other objects and movements on its surface.

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