Statics Question: Is my answer correct?

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In summary, the conversation discusses a physics problem involving a 70-N force acting on a pipe. The first part of the problem involves determining the moment of the force about a certain point, while the second part involves finding the magnitude and direction of a horizontal force that produces the same moment. The solution provided includes calculations for both parts and clarifies the direction of the moment as being clockwise and the direction of the horizontal force as being unspecified.
  • #1
Mesmer
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Please click the image to enlarge it

http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/3952/problemfy9.th.jpg I think I have this problem solved correctly, but please check my solution. In the image my problem is *4-24
The 70-N force acts on the end of the pipe at B Determine (a) The moment of this force about point A, and (B) the magnitude and direction of a horizontal force, applied at C, which produces the same moment take theta = 60 degrees

This is my solution

[tex]M_x\left=-70\cos{60}(0.9)[/tex]
[tex]M_y\left=-70\sin{60}(0.7)[/tex]

which comes out to 73.9 N*M counter clockwise in the Z

For part B
[tex]73.9=Fd[/tex] with d = 0.9
 
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  • #2
Mesmer said:
Please click the image to enlarge it

http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/3952/problemfy9.th.jpg


I think I have this problem solved correctly, but please check my solution. In the image my problem is *4-24
The 70-N force acts on the end of the pipe at B Determine (a) The moment of this force about point A, and (B) the magnitude and direction of a horizontal force, applied at C, which produces the same moment take theta = 60 degrees

This is my solution

[tex]M_x\left=-70\cos{60}(0.9)[/tex]
[tex]M_y\left=-70\sin{60}(0.7)[/tex]

which comes out to 73.9 N*M counter clockwise in the Z

For part B
[tex]73.9=Fd[/tex] with d = 0.9
You're almost there, good work. For part A, the magnitude of the moment is correct, but you said it was counterclockwise. It's actually a clockwise moment, with its direction pointing inward into the page along the z axis.
for part B, again your solution for the magnitude of the Force is correct, but you've got to specify the direction of that force (left or right?) to give the same direction of moment as was determined in part A.
 
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  • #3
PhanthomJay said:
You're almost there, good work. For part A, the magnitude of the moment is correct, but you said it was counterclockwise. It's actually a clockwise moment, with its direction pointing inward into the page along the z axis.
for part B, again your solution for the magnitude of the Force is correct, but you've got to specify the direction of that force (left or right?) to give the same direction of moment as was determined in part A.



Clockwise is negative and CCW is positive. got it!
 

1. How can I check if my answer to a statics question is correct?

To check if your answer is correct, you can use several methods such as comparing your solution with the given answer key, asking your teacher or classmates for feedback, or using online resources and tutorials to verify your approach and calculations.

2. What should I do if my answer to a statics question is different from the given answer?

If your answer is different from the given answer, you should first double-check your calculations and make sure you have followed all the necessary steps correctly. If you still cannot find any errors, you can consult your teacher or seek help from a tutor or online forum to understand where you might have gone wrong.

3. Should I show all my work when answering a statics question?

Yes, it is important to show all your work when answering a statics question. This not only helps you track your steps and calculations but also allows your teacher or peers to provide feedback and identify any errors in your approach.

4. How can I improve my problem-solving skills in statics?

To improve your problem-solving skills in statics, it is essential to practice regularly and work on a variety of problems. You can also seek help from your teacher or other resources to understand different techniques and approaches to solving statics problems.

5. Is it necessary to have a strong mathematical background to excel in statics?

Having a strong mathematical background can be helpful in understanding and solving statics problems. However, it is not a prerequisite as long as you have a good grasp of basic mathematical concepts and are willing to practice and improve your skills.

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