Stored Lithium-ion batteries self exterminate after 2-3 years?

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Drakkith

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And keep recharges as short as possible right? So say I can pick between recharge every 10% drop vs 20%, I should opt for every 10%.. due to the tear on the battery from the recharging process itself (kinda like someone being tortured/stretched)?
I haven't read anything that says to keep charges at a small percent. I'm not exactly sure how the battery would behave, but I know it would still degrade.
 
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I haven't read anything that says to keep charges at a small percent. I'm not exactly sure how the battery would behave, but I know it would still degrade.
Well I have read to rather charge sparingly and often, than seldom and extensively. Some of the information online however regarding these matters is not accepted science.
 
From my experience the only parameter out of many mentioned above guaranteed to kill your battery sooner, is the fast charger supplied by the manufacturer of your phone.

Because of planned obsolescence the factory doesn't care if their product dies in your hands about a couple of years after purchase. They only want your money and their plan is simple:

1. Non-replaceable batteries. ( You can't control this. )
2. Reduced capacity of battery -- look at the ridiculously low Amph on gigantic I-phones ( You can't control this. )
3. A fast charger ( "dedicated to your needs" har, har ) which will fry your battery charging it at a voltage 10-20% more than is needed.

So, you are left with option 3 to throw away all of their fast chargers and replace them with good old slow ones working at a lower voltage. And more so:

Your battery won't fill to its full capacity then, which is good.
You won't charge it so many cycles because of the extended amount of time for each full charge, which is good.
You won't raise its temperature much neither in charging nor while it's working, which is good.

So which method of all mentioned above in this thread do you prefer?
 
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From my experience the only parameter out of many mentioned above guaranteed to kill your battery sooner, is the fast charger supplied by the manufacturer of your phone.

Because of planned obsolescence the factory doesn't care if their product dies in your hands about a couple of years after purchase. They only want your money and their plan is simple:

1. Non-replaceable batteries. ( You can't control this. )
2. Reduced capacity of battery -- look at the ridiculously low Amph on gigantic I-phones ( You can't control this. )
3. A fast charger ( "dedicated to your needs" har, har ) which will fry your battery charging it at a voltage 10-20% more than is needed.

So, you are left with option 3 to throw away all of their fast chargers and replace them with good old slow ones working at a lower voltage. And more so:

Your battery won't fill to its full capacity then, which is good.
You won't charge it so many cycles because of the extended amount of time for each full charge, which is good.
You won't raise its temperature much neither in charging nor while it's working, which is good.

So which method of all mentioned above in this thread do you prefer?
I'm sorry but you are terribly misinformed with regards to quick chargers

"As long as we're all still using lithium-ion batteries in smartphones, the potential for anything negative to happen with your battery is no different with Quick Charge than it is through any other charger, which is to say next to zero as long as the battery isn't being abused."

Here's what Qualcomm had to say on the subject when we asked them:

"Quick Charge 2.0 does not change the way battery charging takes place today. The level of the current going into the battery is controlled by the OEM and depends on battery capacity, battery type, and other factors. Quick Charge 2.0 allows device manufacturers to achieve the full rated capability of the batteries they choose while still meeting the performance and safety standards set by the battery manufacturer. With Quick Charge 2.0, the life of large-format batteries (2000mAh and above) will be in line with that of smaller format batteries charging from traditional USB chargers."

https://www.androidcentral.com/what-qualcomm-quick-charge
 
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[
Without technical knowledge about them specifically, the claim is YES. Just by personal experience.
I had a device with a rechargeable battery packed in. I tried using it 6 years after purchase.. No keep of charge; useless. On the other hand, similar device having been in daily use for more than 7 years still useful. The older device will not keep its charge too long upon recharge, but it still does take a charge and can be used while the one which was stored without use for 6 years became useless. Charging it has no effect - dead!


(small edit on oct 9 2018)
Many thanks. How much of a runtime degradation has the 7 year old one gotten, and how was your usage these 7 years in total? Were you using it very conservatively, or simply charging it cleverly for 7 years?
 
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Now on this issue of storing. Suppose I purchase brand specific Lion batteries dated may 2017 ... Could I charge them up after X amount of time without having to put them in a smartphone? And how often would I ned to boot them up, you think? Storing clearly degrades more than (clever) usage..
The user above testifies to that with 6 year old stored/unused batteries rendered useless, unlike the active 7 year olds!

Also where is the best physical location in your home to store Lion batteries?
 
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Btw, I recently learned I had my own Lenovo Tablet dated 2014 still working. It has been inactive for a total of maybe 8 months of those 4 years. Now interestingly, this thing has been constantly running at 15-30% since inception due to the slow chargers/impatience.

Runtime after 4 years is still roughly the same(!). The runtime due to wear and tear is not noticeable enough for me to give any numbers, but it still delivers fairly solid life. Has occasional quirks but by and large very functional.
 
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What is the relationship between battery charge level and temperature?

As far as I now, the issue with the charge-discharge cycle is that it the chemical reactions inside the battery gradually break down the battery. This happens to some extent for any charge-discharge cycle, regardless of whether it is a 10% cycle or a 100% cycle.
This is from Apple, who I presume uses standard lions...

"You complete one charge cycle when you’ve used (discharged) an amount that equals 100% of your battery’s capacity — but not necessarily all from one charge"

You claimed that a full cycle is not possible by a constant 10% recharge....
 

Drakkith

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Then perhaps I was mistaken.
Perhaps not. Apple contradicts itself..

“After 400 complete cycles, the iPhone’s battery still has 80 percent of its charged capacity,” Joswiak said. “And by a complete charge cycle, I mean completely draining the battery, a full chemical cycle.” In other words, using a little battery and then putting your iPhone back in its dock doesn’t count as a charge cycle. If you use a quarter of your iPhone’s battery and then re-charge it, Joswiak said, that’s the equivalent of a quarter of a charge cycle.

“If you top it off, you’re not wasting a charge cycle,” Joswiak said.

I'm confused
 
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There is a lot of good info here...

https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

Table 2 suggests avoiding deep discharges is a good way to prolong life.
Oh, yes, that part I'm familiar with. It doesn't state what happens to the potential cycles if I recharge it every 1 or 5%, though... How does that affect nr of (potential) cycles? And it doesn't state how consistently I have to follow the depth of discharge levels. What if I sometimes don't? How often do I need to follow it in order to affect cycle lifes in a positive way?
 
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That site appears down at the moment but graph here suggests you shouldn't fully charge or discharge. Eg cycle your cells in the narrow range between 75% and 45% full.

https://www.reddit.com/r/windowsphone/comments/81pp8o/how_to_prolong_lithiumbased_batteries_battery/
Suppose I charge every 10% for maximum amount of cycles. That doesn't take into account that there is probably some amount of maximum amount of charges possible before the battery/phone/ breaks down, making the increasing cycles irrelevant.
 

anorlunda

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That doesn't take into account that there is probably some amount of maximum amount of charges possible before the battery/phone/ breaks down
I think you are trying to take those statements too literally and expecting more precision than is possible.

Cycles are a factor in life, so is state of charge, so is temperature, there may be other factors. Then, holding all those factors constant, there will be a random distribution of actual lifetimes. The random variance may be larger than the named factors.

In the case of Apple, it sounds like they threw a number out there for lifetime in cycles without mentioning other factors. Then some non-technical person pressed with customer questions about what defines a cycle just made up a bunch of words to make the question go away. IMO, one should take all those things with a grain of salt.
 

CWatters

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Suppose I charge every 10% for maximum amount of cycles. That doesn't take into account that there is probably some amount of maximum amount of charges possible before the battery/phone/ breaks down, making the increasing cycles irrelevant.
Look at it this way. Lets say you currently recharge every night. A reasonable question would be …

Q: Is it better to recharge at lunchtime as well, even if you don't need to? Will this give your battery a longer life (eg more years).
A: The answer appears to be yes...

Lets say you currently charge at night and run you phone down to 20% remaining during the daytime. That's a DoD of 80%. Table 2 reproduced below says that if you keep doing that your Li battery will last about 900 cycles = 900 days.

Source:https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

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However if you recharge at lunchtime as well your average DoD will only be 40% and your battery will live for 3000 cycles. However you would be doing two cycles a day instead of one so that works out at 3000/2 = 1500 days.

So by charging twice a day instead of once you might increase battery life from 900 to 1500 days.

PS: Figure 6 at that link also explains that you can also gain battery life by not fully recharging each time. In other words try and only use the "middle" part of the cells capacity. Easier said than done.
 

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Look at it this way. Lets say you currently recharge every night. A reasonable question would be …

Q: Is it better to recharge at lunchtime as well, even if you don't need to? Will this give your battery a longer life (eg more years).
A: The answer appears to be yes...

Lets say you currently charge at night and run you phone down to 20% remaining during the daytime. That's a DoD of 80%. Table 2 reproduced below says that if you keep doing that your Li battery will last about 900 cycles = 900 days.

Source:https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

View attachment 236665

However if you recharge at lunchtime as well your average DoD will only be 40% and your battery will live for 3000 cycles. However you would be doing two cycles a day instead of one so that works out at 3000/2 = 1500 days.

So by charging twice a day instead of once you might increase battery life from 900 to 1500 days.

PS: Figure 6 at that link also explains that you can also gain battery life by not fully recharging each time. In other words try and only use the "middle" part of the cells capacity. Easier said than done.
But don't you think its a very clear finite number of times the battery can receive the voltage input (charging)? Can a Lion Battery withstand daily top-offs for years,? Say I recharge a lion battery 10% 10 times every day for years, you don't think it will break down sooner from overcharging, than if I only charged it once every three days (suppose my usage was limited).
 

anorlunda

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@Pleonasm , you are exhausting the patience of people who have been trying to help you with 93 posts on this simple question, yet the last post circles back to the first.

The answer to every one of your questions can be found at batteryuniversity.com.

Thread closed.
 

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