Stuck on Stress/compression/tension->pic included

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In summary, the conversation is about a problem involving stress, compression, and tension in a curved beam. The equation for bending stress is mentioned, but the speaker is unsure of its exact form and asks for advice. A potential equation is provided, but clarification is requested on whether it is the correct one to use.
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williamx11373
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Stuck on Stress/compression/tension----->pic included

http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f46/maximus11373/1-1.jpg

All info is in the link above


I am stuck on the problem for the longest time.

What I do know is that bending will be at point B and compression at point A.

I just don't know how to calculate the stresses at those points

any advice will help.
 
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Well I can't recall the exact equation at the moment, but you need to look up the equation for bending stress of a curved beam.


EDIT: If I remember the equation correctly (I might be wrong but it looks something like this)

[tex]\sigma_b = \frac{M}{AR}[1+\frac{1}{m}\frac{y}{r+y}][/tex]

where m is constant for a particular cross-section

does that equation look familiar or do you use the equation that accounts for the position of the neutral axis?
 
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Related to Stuck on Stress/compression/tension->pic included

1. What is stress, compression, and tension?

Stress, compression, and tension are all types of forces that act upon objects. Stress is a force that stretches or pulls an object, compression is a force that squeezes or pushes an object, and tension is a force that pulls in opposite directions on an object.

2. How do stress, compression, and tension affect materials?

These forces can cause materials to change shape or even break. For example, too much stress can cause a material to snap, while compression can cause a material to buckle or collapse.

3. What are some real-life examples of stress, compression, and tension?

Stress, compression, and tension can be seen in many everyday situations. For instance, a rubber band experiences tension when stretched, a book experiences compression when placed on a shelf, and a bridge experiences stress from the force of cars driving over it.

4. How can we measure stress, compression, and tension?

There are various instruments that can measure these forces, such as strain gauges, load cells, and force sensors. These instruments can accurately measure the amount of force being applied to an object and the resulting stress, compression, or tension.

5. How can we prevent or reduce stress, compression, and tension on structures?

To prevent or reduce these forces on structures, engineers use various techniques such as adding reinforcements, distributing weight evenly, and using materials with high strength and flexibility. Regular maintenance and inspections can also help identify and address potential issues before they become bigger problems.

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