Studying Chaotic Systems and Careers

In summary, a person with a PhD in controls theory should have the skills to publish research in various fields, but it may be met with skepticism from those in the field. Jumping between fields constantly may be difficult due to grant approvals and the importance of understanding specific details. Additionally, individuals who are unfamiliar with a field may still be able to make meaningful contributions. However, the territorial nature of human beings may make it challenging for outsiders to be accepted in a new field.
  • #1
26
2
If a person gets a phd studying controls theory, shouldn't they have the skills (as a researcher) to publish electrical engineering research one year, economics the next year, and biology the next?

Since someone that studies "systems" generally works in high abstractions, I don't see why the subject at hand really matters. Sure, some systems will require far too much background knowledge to be practical, but I don't see why many topics would require a vast background.

So, if a person studied heavy on controls theory in an Electrical Engineering graduate program, what would keep them from suddenly conducting economics research or something in a field completely unrelated to their thesis used to obtain the phd? Is it unrealistic for someone in academia to jump around between fields constantly?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
When you publish in someone else's field they will likely greet your contribution with skepticism.

Jumping around fields would be hard because you can't write a grant for general problem solving and people are less likely to approve your grant for something outside your field.

Some things can't be overly abstracted sometimes the microscopic details matter.
 
  • #3
In my experience, people who are arrogant and/or ignorant enough to think they can walk straight into a field they know nothing about and start doing useful work are usually called "management consultants".

But they don't usually bother to publish their consultancy reports in academic journals!
 
  • #4
AlephZero said:
In my experience, people who are arrogant and/or ignorant enough to think they can walk straight into a field they know nothing about and start doing useful work are usually called "management consultants".

But they don't usually bother to publish their consultancy reports in academic journals!

Sounds like you don't think very highly of management consultants or consultancy companies. Am I right? :tongue:
 
  • #5
I find that there is evidence all over the place that people often do walk straight into a field they "know nothing about" and make useful contributions. The mistake is that just because they are unfamiliar with the terminology and history of the subject, that they don't know anything about it.
 
  • #6
sus4 said:
I find that there is evidence all over the place that people often do walk straight into a field they "know nothing about" and make useful contributions. The mistake is that just because they are unfamiliar with the terminology and history of the subject, that they don't know anything about it.

Research is conducted by human beings which by nature are territorial
 
  • #7
AlephZero said:
In my experience, people who are arrogant and/or ignorant enough to think they can walk straight into a field they know nothing about and start doing useful work are usually called "management consultants".

But they don't usually bother to publish their consultancy reports in academic journals!

http://xkcd.com/793/
 

1. What are chaotic systems and how are they related to careers?

Chaotic systems are complex systems that exhibit unpredictable behavior. They are related to careers because careers are also complex systems that are influenced by various factors and can be unpredictable.

2. How can studying chaotic systems help with career planning?

Studying chaotic systems can help with career planning by providing a better understanding of the unpredictable nature of careers. It can also help identify potential patterns and trends, and provide insights on how to adapt to change and plan for the future.

3. Can chaotic systems be controlled or predicted?

No, chaotic systems cannot be fully controlled or predicted. They are highly sensitive to initial conditions and even small changes can lead to drastically different outcomes. However, understanding the underlying dynamics of chaotic systems can help make more informed decisions.

4. How do chaotic systems affect career success?

Chaotic systems can have a significant impact on career success. They can create unexpected opportunities or challenges, and can influence factors such as job availability, economic trends, and industry changes. Understanding chaotic systems can help individuals navigate these factors and adapt to changing circumstances.

5. What are some key principles to keep in mind when studying chaotic systems and careers?

Some key principles to keep in mind include the butterfly effect (small changes can have big impacts), sensitivity to initial conditions, and nonlinear relationships (small inputs can lead to large outputs). It is also important to consider the interconnectedness of different factors and the potential for unexpected events to occur.

Suggested for: Studying Chaotic Systems and Careers

Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
840
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
18
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top