Taxpayers funding Christian anti-science private schools

  • Thread starter Evo
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  • #26
Evo
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Given the poor results of public schools I can’t help but wonder if the issue is a red-herring. If the schools don’t produce good results then I can’t see why parents would be lining up to send their kids to these schools. In Canada we have an alternative Catholic school system in some provinces and many non-Catholics try to get their kids into these schools. I also think that the phrase, “tax payer funded” is a bit “incendiary” as parents who send their kids to private schools still are taxed for kids that go to public schools. Do these voucher’s provide enough to compensate for these cost? I suspect for someone in a high tax bracket they wouldn’t.
People that have no children also have to pay these taxes. The taxes are to ensure that every child has access to an education. The problems with the quality of the education is being discussed in another thread.

The main issue in this thead, IMO, is WHAT is being taught and what isn't. If a public tax voucher is used for a school, then there should be educational requirements that the school should meet. Unfortunately in the US we allow children to not be taught even the basics. We seem to have no guidelines for what suffices as education.
 
  • #27
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The "fact" that pi = 3 exactly springs to mind, but I can't quote you the exact chapter and verse.
I'm a fairly "militant" atheist, but even I have to defend the bible on this one. I don't think the bible gave numbers to many significant figures. To one sig fig, pi DOES equal 3. In some of my astronomy classes, when dealing with 4/3*pi (as in the volume of a sphere), we canceled the pi and the 3 to get just 4.

The bible does not say that pi equals 3.000. I'd say that it is no more wrong to claim that pi = 3 than it is to say pi = 3.1 or pi = 3.14, or... you get the picture. All of the above are saying the same thing.

I'm not even certain decimal points existed at the time of writing of the bible.
 
  • #28
tiny-tim
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The "fact" that pi = 3 exactly springs to mind, but I can't quote you the exact chapter and verse.
1 Kings 7:23

And he made the molten sea of ten cubits from brim to brim, round in compass, and the height thereof was five cubits; and a line of thirty cubits did compass it round about.
וַיַּעַשׂ אֶת-הַיָּם, מוּצָק: עֶשֶׂר בָּאַמָּה מִשְּׂפָתוֹ עַד-שְׂפָתוֹ עָגֹל סָבִיב, וְחָמֵשׁ בָּאַמָּה קוֹמָתוֹ, וקוה (וְקָו) שְׁלֹשִׁים בָּאַמָּה, יָסֹב אֹתוֹ סָבִיב

so if the height is the radius, then π = 30/5*2 = 3 o:)

(but the "sea" is described only as round, not hemi-spherical, so is the height the same as the radius?)
 
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  • #29
turbo
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People that have no children also have to pay these taxes. The taxes are to ensure that every child has access to an education.
Yep! My wife and I have no children and Maine's property taxes are quite high. 50% of the property tax goes straight to public education in one's local school district.
 
  • #30
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The thing is, the people that have been pushing for using tax payer money for private schools are mostly christian fundamentalists. How can tax payer funds be given to religious sects?
Evo, I wonder to what extent these private schools are allowed to discriminate. Can they accept only the students with the top grades? If so, they would be able to compare the performance of their students to those of the public schools and declare how much better they are. Public schools could be left with a majority of under performers.

Are they, as a private religious school, allowed to refuse admittance to students not of the same denomination as the school? Are they allowed to expel students who don't uphold the school's religious values, e.g. homosexual students or who hold conflicting religious beliefs, e.g. Jehovah's Witnesses who don't salute the flag?
 
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  • #31
Evo
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Evo, I wonder to what extent these private schools are allowed to discriminate. Can they accept only the students with the top grades? If so, they would be able to compare the performance of their students to those of the public schools and declare how much better they are. Public schools could be left with a majority of under performers.

Are they, as a private religious school, allowed to refuse admittance to students not of the same denomination as the school? Are they allowed to expel students who don't uphold the school's religious values, e.g. homosexual students or who hold conflicting religious beliefs, e.g. Jehovah's Witnesses who don't salute the flag?
That's the problem, there is no education standard for private schools. Each state handles things differently. As far as to what they can get away with, I don't know if there is any tracking.

As far as educational standards, here's an article on New York.

Private and parochial schools -- from small church-run academies to prestigious Manhattan prep schools -- educate about 15 percent of all school-age children in New York State, or 485,453 in 1997. While state law requires these schools to provide an education at least equal in quality to that of public schools, they are largely free to establish their own curriculums and methods and do not have to administer state assessment tests.

Public schools, too, are pressing the state to include the nonpublic schools in the new requirements, saying students will otherwise leave the public schools for less demanding private ones.
http://www.nytimes.com/1998/12/26/n...dards-for-diplomas.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm
 

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